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10.3.5 Sleep = Coma

Message #1 - Posted 2004/08/12 - aRKay

After upgrading to 10.3.5 my G4-AGP has an issue with 'Sleep' in that it will not wake up. I tied everything and the only way I have found to wake it up is to do a RESTART.

I know this has been posted before but I forgot the solution.

Message #2 - Posted 2004/08/12 - Michael Narciso

aRKay wrote:

After upgrading to 10.3.5 my G4-AGP has an issue with 'Sleep' in that it will not wake up. I tied everything and the only way I have found to wake it up is to do a RESTART.

I know this has been posted before but I forgot the solution.

Reset All from Open Firmware. There was a previous thread title "10.3.5 Crash when closing Powerbook lid" that is where I got the solution for this problem.

Message #3 - Posted 2004/08/12 - JonesR

After upgrading to 10.3.5 my G4-AGP has an issue with 'Sleep' in that it will not wake up. I tied everything and the only way I have found to wake it up is to do a RESTART.

I know this has been posted before but I forgot the solution.

Sometimes I wonder what percentage of OS X users, have turned off "Sleep" permanantly, due to its reoccurance as an issue. That is another "solution", one I would bet is easily in double digit percentages for use. (outside of notebooks, at least)

Message #4 - Posted 2004/08/13 - Ian Gregory

Previously, JonesR wrote:

Sometimes I wonder what percentage of OS X users, have turned off "Sleep" permanantly, due to its reoccurance as an issue. That is another "solution", one I would bet is easily in double digit percentages for use. (outside of notebooks, at least)

I turned off sleep on my iBook because of a problem which I could not resolve. There was no problem putting it to sleep and waking it up manually, but when the power manager put it to sleep it would sometimes fail to wake up properly.

The symptom was that it would wake up with screen that was black *except* for the cursor, which was visible and responded to the mouse (so it was not a backlight problem). Choices were then to reset, fast user switch to another account, or ssh in and kill the session.

Recently my logic board went bye-bye and I had to send the machine off to Holland to get it replaced. Now that I have a new logic board I might try re-enabling sleep and see if I still get the same problem.

Incidentally, the Apple Care people asked me for a password before I sent the machine away, so I gave them the username and password for a non-admin account that I just use for testing. When I got it back, that password had been reset to null (no password required), and so had the password on my main admin account, *and* on the root account (which I had never enabled). I found this somewhat disturbing.

Message #5 - Posted 2004/08/13 - JonesR

<< and so
had the password on my main admin account, *and* on the root account (which I had never enabled). I found this somewhat disturbing. >><BR><BR>

Root and admin are different? Too many single users using these multiuser OSes....

Sounds like they asked for the password, so they could be sure it was restored properly after repairs and assumed that you were root and admin.

Which makes me curious... how many people are running several users on their iBooks or PowerBooks? I suppose there are plenty of situations where they are commonly shared as anything.

Message #6 - Posted 2004/08/13 - Ian Gregory

JonesR wrote:

Root and admin are different?

Totally!

passwd:
root:*:0:0::0:0:System Administrator:/var/root:/bin/sh iang:********:501:501::0:0:Ian Gregory:/Users/iang:/bin/bash

group:
admin:*:80:root,iang

When I log in as iang I get admin privilages by virtue of being in the admin group - that is why I refer to it as an admin account.

As a command line geek, the most important admin privilage is the ability to gain UID 0 with sudo, which is granted by virtue of the following line in /etc/sudoers:
%admin ALL=(ALL) ALL

This is a bog standard Mac OS X setup, and it is as it should be. I have never logged in as root and have no intention of doing so.

Message #7 - Posted 2004/08/13 - Madwen

Previously, JonesR wrote:

Sometimes I wonder what percentage of OS X users, have turned off "Sleep" permanantly, due to its reoccurance as an issue.

. ::raises her hand::

After relentless problems over the years with Energy Saver on several Macs including my current G4 and iBook, I never allow the OS to sleep them. I only sleep them manually. I do allow the disks to spin down as that has not been a problem. I also don't use the screen saver either for the same reason.

Message #8 - Posted 2004/08/14 - aRKay

Previously, Michael Narciso wrote:

aRKay wrote:

After upgrading to 10.3.5 my G4-AGP has an issue with 'Sleep' in that it will not wake up. I tied everything and the only way I have found to wake it up is to do a RESTART.

I know this has been posted before but I forgot the solution.

Reset All from Open Firmware. There was a previous thread title "10.3.5 Crash when closing Powerbook lid" that is where I got the solution for this problem.

I don't know how to Reset All from Open Firmware? Do you have a URL or link to Apple that explains what's going on?

Message #9 - Posted 2004/08/15 - Paul Sture

JonesR wrote:

Which makes me curious... how many people are running several users on their iBooks or PowerBooks? I suppose there are plenty of situations where they are commonly shared as anything.

Since the fast switching feature was introduced, I've been using a totally non-privileged account for surfing. I'd been doing that for a long time on my non-Apple systems, so it was a no brainer once fast switching arrived.

Paul Sture

OS X: "It's Unix, Jim, but not as we know it"

Message #10 - Posted 2004/08/17 - Mark Conrad

JonesR wrote:

Which makes me curious... how many people are running several users on their iBooks or PowerBooks? I suppose there are plenty of situations where they are commonly shared as anything.

I use "fast user switching" for things not even related to different human users, because I am the only user on my computer.

I use an application to do several different tasks at once, like for example to get TechTool to defrag' one external disk drive, and wipe the free-space on yet another external disk drive, simultaneously allowing me to surf the Web while all those chores are being done. :)

Try the following just for fun.

Set up four users, "fe", "fi", "fo", "fum".

Use the built-in chess game, where the computer plays against itself.

Set up four seperate games, one game for each user. Just for kicks, set up a different style of chess-board for each user.

Try to start all four games going at the same time.

Periodically check how the various games are progressing, by switching between users.

The whole point is that four entirely seperate games will continue running, using only _one_ chess application.

It is almost like having four seperate chess applications, one for each user.

Even if you don't have any of the four users "active", the four different games will continue to run until they finish.

You could even log-out one of the four users, and the other three user games would continue to run.

I have never tried logging out the main administrative user, that might kill all four of the other users.

We are all familar with running tasks in the background, but fast-user-switching allows us to do more than that.

It allows us to use the _same_ application to simultaneously do entirely different tasks, which I think was not possible before.

This really pays off when an application is asked to do several _different_ tasks at the same time, otherwise just plain running in the background should suffice.

It would make no sense at all in interactive applications, like editors or web browsers, if you tried to run them 'in the background'.

Mark-

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