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[ANN] Power Manager 3.5 - Reduce Your Mac's Energy Costs

Message #1 - Posted 2007/01/04 - Graham Miln

DssW, the leading developer of Mac energy saving software, today announced the launch of Power Manager 3.5 for Mac OS X. The new version of Power Manager makes energy saving easy. Power Manager 3.5 introduces a Schedule Assistant to help users start saving immediately; a status menu that provides quick access to upcoming events; and AppleScript, Automator, and UNIX scripting to give advanced users greater control over their schedule.

For more information about Power Manager visit
<http://www.dssw.co.uk/powermanager/>

Download the free 30 day demonstration
<http://www.dssw.co.uk/powermanager/dsswpowermanager.dmg.zip>

The status menu gives users easy access to their schedule. It takes advantage of new flexible scheduling in Power Manager 3.5, allowing users to cancel or delay any pending event with a single click. The status menu features a new Quick Schedule function, the fastest way to schedule one-off events.

Power Manger 3.5 has some great new features for administrators and advanced users. "Scheduling your Mac has never been so easy," said Graham Miln, DssW's director. "The new engine puts the full capabilities of Power Manager in the hands of our users." Applescript, Automator, and UNIX scripting, allows administrators to control and customise Power Manager 3.5 to meet the individual needs of their organisation. Security is now delegated to the Mac OS X authentication services, providing better integration of Power Manager 3.5 with existing solutions.

The Power Manager System Preference features an improved interface, allowing users to name events in their schedule; and undo support, giving users the freedom to experiment. The System Preference is home to the Schedule Assistant. The Schedule Assistant helps users get started with Power Manager 3.5 by creating a customised schedule to suit their lifestyle.

Other new features include launchd support, improved notification dialogs, and software update checks.

Power Manager helps users save energy by automating their Macs. Users can schedule their Macs to start up or wake, shut down, restart, log out, switch to the login window, and sleep.

Whether you have one Mac or 10,000, Power Manager makes saving energy simple.

Pricing and Availability

Power Manager is available today through the DssW web site <http://www.dssw.co.uk/powermanager/>, for EUR20. Volume discounts for +100 Macs are available. System requirements are Mac OS X 10.3.9 or later.

Version 3.5 is free for registered users of Power Manager 3. --
mailto:support@dssw.co.uk
http://www.dssw.co.uk/ Mac energy saving and power management software

Message #2 - Posted 2007/01/04 - Dave Balderstone

Previously, Graham Miln wrote:

Power Manager is available today through the DssW web site <http://www.dssw.co.uk/powermanager/>, for EUR20.

And how long is the cost recovery period, I wonder...

Message #3 - Posted 2007/01/04 - Jolly Roger

On 2007-01-04 04:33:32 -0600, Graham Miln said:

DssW, the leading developer of Mac energy saving software, today announced the launch of Power Manager 3.5 for Mac OS X. The new version of Power Manager makes energy saving easy.

Energy saving in Mac OS X is not hard as it is.

JR

Message #4 - Posted 2007/01/04 - Graham Miln

Previously, Dave Balderstone wrote:

And how long is the cost recovery period, I wonder...

Depends on your situation, but four common set ups are costed for energy-only return on investment at the link below.

<http://dssw.co.uk/powermanager/energysaving/index.html>

The full research is available at this second link.

<http://dssw.co.uk/research/index.html>

Kind regards,

Graham Miln

mailto:support@dssw.co.uk
http://www.dssw.co.uk/ Mac energy saving and power management software

Message #5 - Posted 2007/01/04 - Tim McNamara

Previously, Dave Balderstone wrote:

Previously, Graham Miln wrote:

Power Manager is available today through the DssW web site <http://www.dssw.co.uk/powermanager/>, for EUR20.

And how long is the cost recovery period, I wonder...

LOL!

Message #6 - Posted 2007/01/04 - Dave Balderstone

Previously, Tim McNamara wrote:

Previously, Dave Balderstone wrote:

Previously, Graham Miln wrote:

Power Manager is available today through the DssW web site <http://www.dssw.co.uk/powermanager/>, for EUR20.

And how long is the cost recovery period, I wonder...

LOL!

They claim two years for a single Mac. However, they are selling version 3.5 for EUR20 with absolutely no indication of an upgrade price or policy.

So... If I buy 3.5 now, and it will take 2- 4 years (yeah, I'm cynical about the 2 years claim) to recover my cost... What happens when OS X 10.5 is released and Lo! And Behold! I need an update? Do I pay another EUR20? It appears so from the web site.

In that case, this software not only saves me nothing, it costs me hard currency to "save energy"...

No thanks, I'll pass.

Message #7 - Posted 2007/01/05 - Graham Miln

Previously, Dave Balderstone wrote:

Power Manager is available today through the DssW web site <http://www.dssw.co.uk/powermanager/>, for EUR20.

They claim two years for a single Mac. However, they are selling version 3.5 for EUR20 with absolutely no indication of an upgrade price or policy.

So... If I buy 3.5 now, and it will take 2- 4 years (yeah, I'm cynical about the 2 years claim) to recover my cost... What happens when OS X 10.5 is released and Lo! And Behold! I need an update? Do I pay another EUR20? It appears so from the web site.

In that case, this software not only saves me nothing, it costs me hard currency to "save energy"...

No thanks, I'll pass.

Dave, thanks for your cynical view. It helps keep our efforts in perspective. :-)

Upgrades for Power Manager 3 have always been free and will continue to be so. An updated main page and an additional page detailing upgrades has been added.

<http://dssw.co.uk/powermanager/upgrade.html>

With regard to the estimated 2 year energy-saving only ROI period, the research is provided in clear English. Of course, for many of our users the energy saving is a nice bonus on top of a useful product.

<http://dssw.co.uk/powermanager/technical/features.html>

Sorry not to gain you as a customer; maybe next time. ;-)

Kind regards,

Graham Miln

mailto:support@dssw.co.uk
http://www.dssw.co.uk/ Mac energy saving and power management software

Message #8 - Posted 2007/01/05 - Dave Balderstone

Previously, Graham Miln wrote:

With regard to the estimated 2 year energy-saving only ROI period, the research is provided in clear English. Of course, for many of our users the energy saving is a nice bonus on top of a useful product.

A quick skim through the white paper does reveal the cost per kWh used to calculate annual savings of $50 - $100 per year per computer & monitor. What was it?

Also, those savings don't match the two year cost recovery you claim for an individual license. What am I missing there?

Sorry not to gain you as a customer; maybe next time.

Indeed. I am impressed with your response to my "cynical view".

djb

"The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it." -- G.B. Shaw

Message #9 - Posted 2007/01/05 - Dave Balderstone

Previously, Dave Balderstone wrote:

A quick skim through the white paper does reveal the cost per kWh used to calculate annual savings of $50 - $100 per year per computer & monitor. What was it?

Typing before my morning coffee:

"A quick skim through the white paper does NOT reveal the cost per kWh used"

Message #10 - Posted 2007/01/05 - Paul Sture

Previously, Dave Balderstone wrote:

"A quick skim through the white paper does NOT reveal the cost per kWh used"

Um, I've just looked for this white paper and couldn't find it. Anyone have a url handy please?

Paul Sture

Message #11 - Posted 2007/01/05 - Michelle Steiner

Previously, Graham Miln wrote:

Upgrades for Power Manager 3 have always been free and will continue to be so. An updated main page and an additional page detailing upgrades has been added.

So if Power Manager 3.x is not compatible with OS X 10.5, and you decide to call the Leopard-compatible version 4.0, woud that entail a new registration fee?

I downloaded your demo, and will install it the next time I want to restart my Macintosh, but I'm not going to restart it just to evaluate a demonstration program. But I don't see how it can help me, personally. I keep the Mac running 24/7, at night it runs the daily, weekly, and monthly tasks at 3 am. Then at 5 am it does a backup. During the day, I'm on and off the computer all day, so shutting it down and turning it on four to eight times a day seems counterproductive.

I do have one question not directly related to the product, though. Why do you zip the .dmg file? .dmg files can be downloaded without any problems; zipping them merely adds an extra step at both ends, with no discernable advantage.

Support the troops: Bring them home ASAP.

Message #12 - Posted 2007/01/05 - -hh

Dave Balderstone wrote (twice):

A quick skim through the white paper does reveal the cost per kWh used to calculate annual savings of $50 - $100 per year per computer & monitor. What was it?

Typing before my morning coffee:

"A quick skim through the white paper does NOT reveal the cost per kWh used"

It is US$0.10/kWh, and is buried in footnote #21. That rate assumption is reasonable IMO.

The claimed $100/year is based on a PC with a CRT, whereas the $50/year changes to a LCD. For those looking for an excuse to buy a new monitor <g>, this suggests a $50/year hypothetical svings for replacing your CRT with an LCD.

However, either number appears to be an example of the extreme of going from the absolute worst case power consumption (always full on, 24/7) to best case. Since the app only costs roughly US$30 and 2 year ROI, this would infer that they're suggesting that the real world application is much less than this worst case - - specifically, they're inferring a savings of $15/year - - which would be obviously due to some partial savings have already been realized, which IMO is a reasonable assumption.

However, what this also infers is that these real world savings from invoking of existing features & methods can typically provide (by simple subtraction: $50/year minus $15/year) roughly $35/year savings on their own, effectively for free. YMMV on the relative (in)convenience levels.

IMO, it doesn't really seem to make all that much sense to me for an individual or very small business operator, due to touch labor management expenses that aren't being accounted for. But a site licence for a lab, assuming it featured appropriate remote group management tools to minimize the Administrator's touch labor costs, may very well be an effective tool for a NetAdmin to cut down on his cluster's aggregate power costs and thus, worth looking into.

-hh

Message #13 - Posted 2007/01/05 - Dave Balderstone

Previously, -hh wrote:

It is US$0.10/kWh, and is buried in footnote #21. That rate assumption is reasonable IMO.

Thanks. I'm currently paying CAD $0.0899/kWh, which is US $0.0764, residential rate. The business rate here is CAD $0.05049, or US $0.0429, So we'd be looking at about a four year return (we're primarily LCD monitors here).

Oh, "here" is Saskatoon, Canada.

We have about 80 computers in our operation, and the volume license is EUR 1600, or about CAD $2500. Not a huge sum, but at a four year ROI, it would never fly.

Message #14 - Posted 2007/01/05 - Dave Balderstone

Previously, Paul Sture wrote:

Previously, Dave Balderstone wrote:

"A quick skim through the white paper does NOT reveal the cost per kWh used"

Um, I've just looked for this white paper and couldn't find it. Anyone have a url handy please?

<http://dssw.co.uk/research/computer_energy_consumption.html>

djb

Message #15 - Posted 2007/01/05 - Dave Balderstone

Previously, Michelle Steiner wrote:

I downloaded your demo, and will install it the next time I want to restart my Macintosh, but I'm not going to restart it just to evaluate a demonstration program. But I don't see how it can help me, personally. I keep the Mac running 24/7, at night it runs the daily, weekly, and monthly tasks at 3 am. Then at 5 am it does a backup. During the day, I'm on and off the computer all day, so shutting it down and turning it on four to eight times a day seems counterproductive.

The other issue is component failure. We have a lot of computers that run 24/7, and the majority of board and drive failures we experience is after a prolonged power outage, where the UPS's initiate a shutdown.

That, combined with our rates (half the assumed rate in the white paper which means at least a 4-year ROI), really preclude me from any serious interest in this software. I've no doubt there's a niche for it somewhere, but it isn't here.

Message #16 - Posted 2007/01/05 - Paul Sture

Previously, Dave Balderstone wrote:

Previously, Paul Sture wrote:

Previously, Dave Balderstone wrote:

"A quick skim through the white paper does NOT reveal the cost per kWh used"

Um, I've just looked for this white paper and couldn't find it. Anyone have a url handy please?

<http://dssw.co.uk/research/computer_energy_consumption.html>

Thanks.

Paul Sture

Message #17 - Posted 2007/01/05 - Graham Miln

Previously, Michelle Steiner wrote:

So if Power Manager 3.x is not compatible with OS X 10.5, and you decide to call the Leopard-compatible version 4.0, woud that entail a new registration fee?

Michelle, I hope our past behaviour will be a good predictor of our future actions; we continue to support Mac OS X 10.3.9, and we provided all our Power Manager 2 (Mac Classic) users with free licences for Power Manager 3 (Mac OS X).

With regard to Leopard (Mac OS X 10.5), until the final build is shipped I will not comment on compatibility.

I feel it is sad that a significant upgrade to Mac OS X should cause users concern about their existing software.

If an update is required for Mac OS X 10.5.0, it will be free to registered users.

I downloaded your demo, and will install it the next time I want to restart my Macintosh, but I'm not going to restart it just to evaluate a demonstration program.

The restart is regrettable but required to ensure the installed security rights take hold. Our testing revealed Apple's securityd daemon did not reliably propagate the required changes until after a restart.

To ensure a predictable experience, the installer requires a restart.

<http://dssw.co.uk/powermanager/resources/guide/security_and_rights.html>

But I don't see how it can help me, personally. I keep the Mac running 24/7, at night it runs the daily, weekly, and monthly tasks at 3 am. Then at 5 am it does a backup. During the day, I'm on and off the computer all day, so shutting it down and turning it on four to eight times a day seems counterproductive.

Given your usage pattern, it understandable that Power Manager 3.5's energy saving alone may not be reason enough.

I do have one question not directly related to the product, though. Why do you zip the .dmg file? .dmg files can be downloaded without any problems; zipping them merely adds an extra step at both ends, with no discernable advantage.

We found in testing that some older browsers had problems with downloading '.dmg' files. If time allows, we will review the issue again.

Have a good weekend.

Kind regards,

Graham Miln

mailto:support@dssw.co.uk
http://www.dssw.co.uk/ Mac energy saving and power management software

Message #18 - Posted 2007/01/05 - Graham Miln

Previously, Paul Sture wrote:

Um, I've just looked for this white paper and couldn't find it. Anyone have a url handy please?

Paul, the energy saving study is available at the link below. A page listing a set of applied examples is also linked below.

Energy saving research
<http://dssw.co.uk/research/index.html>

Applied examples
<http://dssw.co.uk/powermanager/energysaving/index.html>

Hope this helps.

Kind regards,

Graham Miln

mailto:support@dssw.co.uk
http://www.dssw.co.uk/ Mac energy saving and power management software

Message #19 - Posted 2007/01/05 - Graham Miln

Previously, Dave Balderstone wrote:

The other issue is component failure. We have a lot of computers that run 24/7, and the majority of board and drive failures we experience is after a prolonged power outage, where the UPS's initiate a shutdown.

That, combined with our rates (half the assumed rate in the white paper which means at least a 4-year ROI), really preclude me from any serious interest in this software. I've no doubt there's a niche for it somewhere, but it isn't here.

Dave, thank you for your detailed replies.

It has been interesting to hear the range of opinions expressed by yourself and others throughout this thread.

I would be interested to see modern controlled studies demonstrating component failure, to support the anecdotal evidence.

Power Manager has been used in a hospital environment to actively seek out premature component failure with repeated, automated restarts. The users were able to isolate a few bad Macs out of a thousand before they went into critical locations.

What ROI would you need to see before showing serious interest? Feel like chatting privately? :-)

Have a good weekend.

Kind regards,

Graham Miln

mailto:support@dssw.co.uk
http://www.dssw.co.uk/ Mac energy saving and power management software

Message #20 - Posted 2007/01/05 - Michelle Steiner

Previously, Graham Miln wrote:

So if Power Manager 3.x is not compatible with OS X 10.5, and you decide to call the Leopard-compatible version 4.0, woud that entail a new registration fee?

Michelle, I hope our past behaviour will be a good predictor of our future actions; we continue to support Mac OS X 10.3.9, and we provided all our Power Manager 2 (Mac Classic) users with free licences for Power Manager 3 (Mac OS X).

Your web site says "Power Manager 1 and 2 users running Mac OS 9 or earlier need to purchase a new licence."

With regard to Leopard (Mac OS X 10.5), until the final build is shipped I will not comment on compatibility.

Totally understandable.

I feel it is sad that a significant upgrade to Mac OS X should cause users concern about their existing software.

Unfortunately, OS X upgrades have broken software before, so it is a concern.

I downloaded your demo, and will install it the next time I want to restart my Macintosh, but I'm not going to restart it just to evaluate a demonstration program.

The restart is regrettable but required to ensure the installed security rights take hold.

Understandable. I'm in no hurry to try it out, so I'll wait until I need to restart the computer.

When I saw your first message, my reaction was "Here's another spammer touting his product. Posts to newsgroups and we'll never see him again." I'm glad to see that I was wrong about that.

Support the troops: Bring them home ASAP.

Message #21 - Posted 2007/01/05 - Dave Balderstone

Previously, Michelle Steiner wrote:

When I saw your first message, my reaction was "Here's another spammer touting his product. Posts to newsgroups and we'll never see him again." I'm glad to see that I was wrong about that.

I'll echo that.

djb

Message #22 - Posted 2007/01/05 - Dave Balderstone

Previously, Graham Miln wrote:

Dave, thank you for your detailed replies.

You're welcome. I find your responsiveness and demeanor refreshing compared to some of the driftwood software shills we see in these newsgroups.

It has been interesting to hear the range of opinions expressed by yourself and others throughout this thread.

I would be interested to see modern controlled studies demonstrating component failure, to support the anecdotal evidence.

Power Manager has been used in a hospital environment to actively seek out premature component failure with repeated, automated restarts. The users were able to isolate a few bad Macs out of a thousand before they went into critical locations.

What ROI would you need to see before showing serious interest?

Maximum 12 months.

Feel like chatting privately? :-)

At this point, no. I'm no longer the IT director here (took a sideways move a few years back) and our current head is on vacation.

I will download the demo and have a look, and have a conversation with him at some point after his return, though.

Best wishes for your continued success,

djb

Message #23 - Posted 2007/01/10 - Randy Howard

On Thu, 4 Jan 2007 04:33:32 -0600, Graham Miln wrote (in a previous article):

DssW, the leading developer of Mac energy saving software, today announced the launch of Power Manager 3.5 for Mac OS X.

Or I could just click on the "save energy" power management option and get the same thing for free. Pass.

Randy Howard (2reply remove FOOBAR)
"The power of accurate observation is called cynicism by those who have not got it." - George Bernard Shaw

Message #24 - Posted 2007/01/10 - Randy Howard

On Thu, 4 Jan 2007 04:33:32 -0600, Graham Miln wrote (in a previous article):

DssW, the leading developer of Mac energy saving software, today announced the launch of Power Manager 3.5 for Mac OS X.

Or I could just click on the "save energy" power management option and get the same thing for free. Pass.

Randy Howard (2reply remove FOOBAR)
"The power of accurate observation is called cynicism by those who have not got it." - George Bernard Shaw

Message #25 - Posted 2007/01/10 - Randy Howard

On Tue, 9 Jan 2007 18:14:54 -0600, Randy Howard wrote (in a previous article):

On Thu, 4 Jan 2007 04:33:32 -0600, Graham Miln wrote (in a previous article):

DssW, the leading developer of Mac energy saving software, today announced the launch of Power Manager 3.5 for Mac OS X.

Or I could just click on the "save energy" power management option and get the same thing for free. Pass.

Sorry for the double post, dunno what happened. The correct wording on the option I am referring to is actually "Better Energy Savings", which shows up in the top bar on my MBP under the battery icon. Don't remember if it is there by default on a fresh install or I put it there.

Randy Howard (2reply remove FOOBAR)
"The power of accurate observation is called cynicism by those who have not got it." - George Bernard Shaw

Message #26 - Posted 2007/01/12 - Graham Miln

Previously, Randy Howard wrote:

Or I could just click on the "save energy" power management option and get the same thing for free. Pass.

Sorry for the double post, dunno what happened. The correct wording on the option I am referring to is actually "Better Energy Savings", which shows up in the top bar on my MBP under the battery icon. Don't remember if it is there by default on a fresh install or I put it there.

Randy, thanks for the gibe. :-)

You are right, Power Manager on your single MacBook Pro is unlikely to gain you a huge amount of energy saving. It all comes down to individual usage patterns.

Power Manager is best suited to saving energy within managed Mac environments, and for those with specific power scheduling needs.

<http://www.dssw.co.uk/powermanager/resources/guide/creating_a_schedule.h tml>

Looking forward to convincing you with a future version.

Kind regards,

Graham Miln

mailto:support@dssw.co.uk
http://www.dssw.co.uk/ Mac energy saving and power management software

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