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Can Windoze machines sleep?

Message #1 - Posted 2004/11/27 - Tho X. Bui

Hey there,

A few years ago, during the dark days of Apple, I was toying with purchasing a windoze laptop. I was shocked to find out at the time that their machines don't "sleep." The salesman at the time told me that that feature is "in the works."

So any body here knows the status of this?

Tho

Message #2 - Posted 2004/11/27 - Tom Harrington

Previously, Tho X. Bui wrote:

Hey there,

A few years ago, during the dark days of Apple, I was toying with purchasing a windoze laptop. I was shocked to find out at the time that their machines don't "sleep." The salesman at the time told me that that feature is "in the works."

So any body here knows the status of this?

I expect it works, but this has got to be one of the worst possible places to ask about how Windows works.

Tom "Tom" Harrington
Macaroni, Automated System Maintenance for Mac OS X.
Version 2.0: Delocalize, Repair Permissions, lots more.
See http://www.atomicbird.com/

Message #3 - Posted 2004/11/27 - Tho X. Bui

Tom Harrington wrote:

Previously, Tho X. Bui wrote:

Hey there,

A few years ago, during the dark days of Apple, I was toying with purchasing a windoze laptop. I was shocked to find out at the time that their machines don't "sleep." The salesman at the time told me that that feature is "in the works."

So any body here knows the status of this?

I expect it works, but this has got to be one of the worst possible places to ask about how Windows works.

-)

Yeah, you're right. But it's a feature that only "We" understand.

Tho

Message #4 - Posted 2004/11/27 - Davoud

Tho X. Bui:

A few years ago, during the dark days of Apple, I was toying with purchasing a windoze laptop. I was shocked to find out at the time that their machines don't "sleep." The salesman at the time told me that that feature is "in the works."

My Vaio laptop/XP Pro has a feature called "Hibernate." Someone told me that it is, as the name implies, deeper than "sleep." Anyway, it works. It takes a bit longer to awaken than a sleeping Mac, but not an excessive amount of time.

Davoud

usenet *at* davidillig dawt com

Message #5 - Posted 2004/11/28 - Motorola Littleender

Of course Windows laptops can sleep - they can *also* hibernate, which is just about the only thing that Apple laptops can't do that Windows machines can.

Hibernate (as understood by Windows) = save the system state (including the contents of memory) to disk and completely power down the machine. You can remove the battery, wait a year, and then plug in a battery or AC power, and the machine will come out of hibernation to the state where you left it (slower than waking from sleep because the hardware has to restart and then the system state has to be loaded into memory). There was a buggy equivalent in OS8/9 called "suspend to disk".

Sleep (as understood by Windows) = shut down the hard disk and screen, but keep the system running at low power so that the memory retains its contents and the system can wake up quickly. If the battery runs down then everything in memory is lost - unless, as in most systems, the machine is set to hibernate automatically after a certain amount of sleep time or when the battery gets very low.

"Tho X. Bui" <blahx3@earthlink.net> wrote in message news:41A8C988.90B2BC9A@earthlink.net...

Hey there,

A few years ago, during the dark days of Apple, I was toying with purchasing a windoze laptop. I was shocked to find out at the time that their machines don't "sleep." The salesman at the time told me that that feature is "in the works."

So any body here knows the status of this?

Tho

Message #6 - Posted 2004/11/28 - yomgui

what windows machine can do as well is to not sleep when you close the lid. unfortunately, mac can't ( even if there was a hack it doesn't work under 10.3 )

yomgui

"Tho X. Bui" wrote:

Hey there,

A few years ago, during the dark days of Apple, I was toying with purchasing a windoze laptop. I was shocked to find out at the time that their machines don't "sleep." The salesman at the time told me that that feature is "in the works."

So any body here knows the status of this?

Tho

Message #7 - Posted 2004/11/29 - Ray

On 2004-11-27 13:38:00 -0500, Tho X. Bui said:

Hey there,

A few years ago, during the dark days of Apple, I was toying with purchasing a windoze laptop. I was shocked to find out at the time that their machines don't "sleep." The salesman at the time told me that that feature is "in the works."

So any body here knows the status of this?

Tho

Windows PC can "sleep" but there can be problems when the machine comes out of sleep
mode. My PowerBook has no problems sleeping, but my band new Dell hangs 50% of the
time.

Message #8 - Posted 2004/11/29 - Kevin

Tho X. Bui wrote:

A few years ago, during the dark days of Apple, I was toying with purchasing a windoze laptop. I was shocked to find out at the time that their machines don't "sleep." The salesman at the time told me that that feature is "in the works."

It's called "Stand By" on Windows, not "sleep".

And like the others said, it worked OK, but sometimes it didn't, and the uncertainty of that was enough to make me distrust the feature and not use it. So I always used Hibernate instead.

Message #9 - Posted 2004/11/30 - Rick Blythin

"Tho X. Bui" <blahx3@earthlink.net> wrote in message news:41A8C988.90B2BC9A@earthlink.net...

Hey there,

A few years ago, during the dark days of Apple, I was toying with purchasing a windoze laptop. I was shocked to find out at the time that their machines don't "sleep." The salesman at the time told me that that feature is "in the works."

So any body here knows the status of this?

Tho

Being a certified PC and network tech here's a quick explanation:

Windows has two main features Stand by and Hibernate:

Stand by: Which shuts down everything, hard drive, LCD etc, and goes into a low power mode. This is the closest thing to sleep on a Mac.

Hibernate: A special file is created which puts all the information from memory and writes it to the hard drive, then unlike stand-by the system then does a full shut down. Upon start-up the info is put back into memory and you can continue using the apps you had left open.

Pros to stand-by: quicker then hibernate, Cons: all info is lost if the power goes out (On desktops).
Pros to hibernate: Data is more secure, Cons: restoring takes slightly longer.

The salesman didn't appear to know what he was talking about, as stand-by mode is effectively sleep on the Mac. I haven't timed them side by side but I'd say my powerbook would edge out my desktop in terms of coming out of standby/sleep.

I hope this helps answer your question :-)

Rick

Message #10 - Posted 2004/11/30 - Tho X. Bui

Rick Blythin wrote:

"Tho X. Bui" <blahx3@earthlink.net> wrote in message

Hey there,

A few years ago, during the dark days of Apple, I was toying with purchasing a windoze laptop. I was shocked to find out at the time that their machines don't "sleep." The salesman at the time told me that that feature is "in the works."

Being a certified PC and network tech here's a quick explanation: Windows has two main features Stand by and Hibernate:..[snip]... The salesman didn't appear to know what he was talking about, as stand-by mode is effectively sleep on the Mac.

On the behalf of that PC salesman: as I indicated, this was a while back during the "dark days of Apple." My main machine was a relatively new PB2400c, OS 8.6 has not yet been created, Steve J. was in exile, etc.... Why, it was so primitive, my laptop was powered by a potato battery. I think windoz 95 was just released a year or two before.

But my cute lil' pb2400c Comet could sleep and snore even back then.

Thanks to all the pc experts for the education.

Tho

Message #11 - Posted 2004/12/04 - c123

Ray <ray2230@msn.com> wrote in news:2004112911485465426%ray2230@msncom:

On 2004-11-27 13:38:00 -0500, Tho X. Bui said:

Hey there,

A few years ago, during the dark days of Apple, I was toying with purchasing a windoze laptop. I was shocked to find out at the time that their machines don't "sleep." The salesman at the time told me that that feature is "in the works."

So any body here knows the status of this?

Tho

Windows PC can "sleep" but there can be problems when the machine comes out of sleep
mode. My PowerBook has no problems sleeping, but my band new Dell hangs 50% of the
time.

I've been able to get sleep/hibernate to work for roughly three months of the three yesra I've had my Dell laptop (Inspiron 8100).

As another poster said, hibernate is *very* good, but only when it works.

Although Apple machines do not hibernate, I've been very impressed with their sleep mode on my new powerbook :))

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