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Energy Saver Schedule

Message #1 - Posted 2007/02/10 - chrolson@gmail.com

Just curious, what is the hardware mechanism that allows for the OS X to automatically startup and shutdown via setting the Energy Saver Schedule?

Message #2 - Posted 2007/02/10 - Mike Rosenberg

chrolson@gmail.com wrote:

Just curious, what is the hardware mechanism that allows for the OS X to automatically startup and shutdown via setting the Energy Saver Schedule?

Um, how about a timer? I mean, I can have a table lamp turn on and off at scheduled times using that mechanism, so why shouldn't a computer use one?

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Message #3 - Posted 2007/02/10 - Clever Monkey

On Feb 10, 9:08 am, "chrol...@gmail.com wrote:

Just curious, what is the hardware mechanism that allows for the OS X to automatically startup and shutdown via setting the Energy Saver Schedule?

A real-time clock and a non-maskable interrupt, probably.

Message #4 - Posted 2007/02/10 - Jolly Roger

On 2007-02-10 08:08:00 -0600, "chrolson@gmail.com said:

Just curious, what is the hardware mechanism that allows for the OS X to automatically startup and shutdown via setting the Energy Saver Schedule?

The Power Management Unit (PMU) is an integrated chip on the motherboard.

JR

Message #5 - Posted 2007/02/11 - Matthew T. Russotto

Previously, chrolson@gmail.com wrote:

Just curious, what is the hardware mechanism that allows for the OS X to automatically startup and shutdown via setting the Energy Saver Schedule?

A proprietary microcontroller called the PMU (Power Management Unit) in later PowerPC Macs. It appears this function is part of another proprietary microcontroller called the System Management Controller in the Intel macs.

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