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Ethernet fails after sleeping?

Message #1 - Posted 2004/08/31 - Kevin

So I plug in my Ethernet cable into my Powerbook 12", and I instantly get an ethernet connection. This is good, because my Airport connection has been flaky lately.

All is well until I put the unit to sleep, and wake it up again at some later point. Now, the Ethernet link is physically dead -- the Network control panel reports "Cable is not plugged in". I go downstairs to my hub, and it's not showing me a link light anymore.

I reset the hub downstairs and I get the link light back and the Mac's back on the Ethernet. Until I put it to sleep again...

Any idea why this is happening? I'd guess that somehow the router/hub doesn't like something that happens to the connection when the Mac sleeps (or wakes) and thus partitions the port or even disables it... but I don't see why it would do this. My other computers worked just fine using the same port and cable.

Any ideas?

Message #2 - Posted 2004/08/31 - jpm

On 2004-08-31 15:10:20 -0700, Kevin said:

So I plug in my Ethernet cable into my Powerbook 12", and I instantly get an ethernet connection. This is good, because my Airport connection has been flaky lately.

All is well until I put the unit to sleep, and wake it up again at some later point. Now, the Ethernet link is physically dead -- the Network control panel reports "Cable is not plugged in". I go downstairs to my hub, and it's not showing me a link light anymore.

I reset the hub downstairs and I get the link light back and the Mac's back on the Ethernet. Until I put it to sleep again...

Any idea why this is happening? I'd guess that somehow the router/hub doesn't like something that happens to the connection when the Mac sleeps (or wakes) and thus partitions the port or even disables it... but I don't see why it would do this. My other computers worked just fine using the same port and cable.

Any ideas?

What happens when you disconnect prior to putting the unit to sleep?

John McWilliams

Message #3 - Posted 2004/09/01 - Kevin

jpm wrote:

Any ideas?

What happens when you disconnect prior to putting the unit to sleep?

I believe the problem still occurs.

I wonder if my router's just jumpy, or what.

Message #4 - Posted 2004/09/02 - David C. Stone

Previously, Kevin wrote:

jpm wrote:

Any ideas?

What happens when you disconnect prior to putting the unit to sleep?

I believe the problem still occurs.

I wonder if my router's just jumpy, or what.

I remember hearing of similar problems back around 10.1 or so, when the router was dishing out IP addresses by DHCP, although I don't remember the details. Is that your current network configuration? If so, you could always try using a static non-routing IP for the Mac, and configure the router to hand out addresses starting at a higher base address. The only other thing I remember is tales of problems with full/half duplex when both Mac and router are on "auto-negotiate" for the network connection, but I'm not sure if that would create the problem you are observing.

Hang on... [Googles] ... here, try this:

http://makeashorterlink.com/?U55132339

Message #5 - Posted 2004/09/03 - Kevin

David C. Stone wrote:

I remember hearing of similar problems back around 10.1 or so, when the router was dishing out IP addresses by DHCP, although I don't remember the details. Is that your current network configuration? If so, you could always try using a static non-routing IP for the Mac, and configure the router to hand out addresses starting at a higher base address. The only other thing I remember is tales of problems with full/half duplex when both Mac and router are on "auto-negotiate" for the network connection, but I'm not sure if that would create the problem you are observing.

Thanks. I'll try your suggestions... But would a DHCP or duplex problem cause a problem that appears to be at the hardware layer? The link LEDs on the hub don't even light, it's like the cable is rendered totally dead. Assuming it was a duplex thing, how could I fix it? I know in Windows if you dig deep into the settings of a network card you could find options to control half/full duplex, etc.

Thanks for your help. I hope I can solve this one, as I'd hate to think I have a defect. Warranty is going to run out in October...

Message #6 - Posted 2004/09/03 - David C. Stone

Previously, Kevin wrote:

David C. Stone wrote:

I remember hearing of similar problems back around 10.1 or so, when the router was dishing out IP addresses by DHCP, although I don't remember the details. Is that your current network configuration? If so, you could always try using a static non-routing IP for the Mac, and configure the router to hand out addresses starting at a higher base address. The only other thing I remember is tales of problems with full/half duplex when both Mac and router are on "auto-negotiate" for the network connection, but I'm not sure if that would create the problem you are observing.

Thanks. I'll try your suggestions... But would a DHCP or duplex problem cause a problem that appears to be at the hardware layer? The link LEDs on the hub don't even light, it's like the cable is rendered totally dead. Assuming it was a duplex thing, how could I fix it? I know in Windows if you dig deep into the settings of a network card you could find options to control half/full duplex, etc.

There's a CLI command that lets you force a particular setting; I'm sure if you google on "OS X setting full duplex" you'll find something. I also noticed some of the links in that google search I posted the URL for look similar to your problem. Definitely check out the macosxhints website.

Thanks for your help. I hope I can solve this one, as I'd hate to think I have a defect. Warranty is going to run out in October...

Good luck!

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