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iBook 14" battery innards

Message #1 - Posted 2006/04/04 - X Kyle M Thompson

Since I do not have a triagular screwdriver I cannot open my old battery to look, but was wondering what the actual cells used in a 14' iBook battery were? If they are something I can get from Maplin/RS et al then I suppose I could make myself a spare?

kt.

He said 'I'm going to chop off the bottom of one of your trouser legs and put it in a library.'
I thought 'That's a turn-up for the books.

Message #2 - Posted 2006/04/05 - Peter Ceresole

X Kyle M Thompson wrote:

Since I do not have a triagular screwdriver I cannot open my old battery to look, but was wondering what the actual cells used in a 14' iBook battery were? If they are something I can get from Maplin/RS et al then I suppose I could make myself a spare?

I think Adrian Tuddenham has looked inside iBook batteries, in the past, and revived them. I remember looking inside a dead one and the actual cells are fairly 'normal' looking NiMH ones. AA sized at a guess. Plus a number of resistors and/or diodes. At that point I gave up but I'm sure that with a bit more determination it might have been fixable. --
Peter

Message #3 - Posted 2006/04/05 - X Kyle M Thompson

On Wed, 5 Apr 2006, Peter Ceresole wrote:

X Kyle M Thompson wrote:

Since I do not have a triagular screwdriver I cannot open my old battery to look, but was wondering what the actual cells used in a 14' iBook battery were? If they are something I can get from Maplin/RS et al then I suppose I could make myself a spare?

I think Adrian Tuddenham has looked inside iBook batteries, in the past, and revived them. I remember looking inside a dead one and the actual cells are fairly 'normal' looking NiMH ones. AA sized at a guess. Plus a number of resistors and/or diodes. At that point I gave up but I'm sure that with a bit more determination it might have been fixable.

Perhaps I'll try and find an appropriate screwdriver and give it a go. Is there anything in there that will give me a shock, I wonder?

You know, somebody actually complimented me on my driving today. They left a little note on the windscreen,
it said 'Parking Fine.' So that was nice.

Message #4 - Posted 2006/04/05 - Mark

On Wed, 5 Apr 2006 21:04:04 +0100, X Kyle M Thompson wrote (in a previous article):

On Wed, 5 Apr 2006, Peter Ceresole wrote:

X Kyle M Thompson wrote:

Since I do not have a triagular screwdriver I cannot open my old battery to look, but was wondering what the actual cells used in a 14' iBook battery were? If they are something I can get from Maplin/RS et al then I suppose I could make myself a spare?

I think Adrian Tuddenham has looked inside iBook batteries, in the past, and revived them. I remember looking inside a dead one and the actual cells are fairly 'normal' looking NiMH ones. AA sized at a guess. Plus a number of resistors and/or diodes. At that point I gave up but I'm sure that with a bit more determination it might have been fixable.

Perhaps I'll try and find an appropriate screwdriver and give it a go. Is there anything in there that will give me a shock, I wonder?

How expensive they are if you have to buy a new one?

Message #5 - Posted 2006/04/05 - X Kyle M Thompson

On Wed, 5 Apr 2006, Mark wrote:

On Wed, 5 Apr 2006 21:04:04 +0100, X Kyle M Thompson wrote (in a previous article):

On Wed, 5 Apr 2006, Peter Ceresole wrote:

X Kyle M Thompson wrote:

Since I do not have a triagular screwdriver I cannot open my old battery to look, but was wondering what the actual cells used in a 14' iBook battery were? If they are something I can get from Maplin/RS et al then I suppose I could make myself a spare?

I think Adrian Tuddenham has looked inside iBook batteries, in the past, and revived them. I remember looking inside a dead one and the actual cells are fairly 'normal' looking NiMH ones. AA sized at a guess. Plus a number of resistors and/or diodes. At that point I gave up but I'm sure that with a bit more determination it might have been fixable.

Perhaps I'll try and find an appropriate screwdriver and give it a go. Is there anything in there that will give me a shock, I wonder?

How expensive they are if you have to buy a new one?

Oh, I already got one from ebay for GBP20 - nearly a year old, and only at 78% capacity, but cheaper than GBP88 for a new one.

kt.

You know, somebody actually complimented me on my driving today. They left a little note on the windscreen,
it said 'Parking Fine.' So that was nice.

Message #6 - Posted 2006/04/06 - Chris Ridd

On 5/4/06 9:04, in article Pine.OSX.4.58.0604052103090.6203@tigger.local, X Kyle M Thompson wrote:

Perhaps I'll try and find an appropriate screwdriver and give it a go. Is there anything in there that will give me a shock, I wonder?

The naked picture of Steve Jobs!

Cheers,

Chris

Message #7 - Posted 2006/04/06 - Mark

On Wed, 5 Apr 2006 23:59:50 +0100, X Kyle M Thompson wrote (in a previous article):

On Wed, 5 Apr 2006, Mark wrote:

On Wed, 5 Apr 2006 21:04:04 +0100, X Kyle M Thompson wrote (in a previous article):

On Wed, 5 Apr 2006, Peter Ceresole wrote:

X Kyle M Thompson wrote:

Since I do not have a triagular screwdriver I cannot open my old battery to look, but was wondering what the actual cells used in a 14' iBook battery were? If they are something I can get from Maplin/RS et al then I suppose I could make myself a spare?

I think Adrian Tuddenham has looked inside iBook batteries, in the past, and revived them. I remember looking inside a dead one and the actual cells are fairly 'normal' looking NiMH ones. AA sized at a guess. Plus a number of resistors and/or diodes. At that point I gave up but I'm sure that with a bit more determination it might have been fixable.

Perhaps I'll try and find an appropriate screwdriver and give it a go. Is there anything in there that will give me a shock, I wonder?

How expensive they are if you have to buy a new one?

Oh, I already got one from ebay for GBP20 - nearly a year old, and only at 78% capacity, but cheaper than GBP88 for a new one.

kt.

£20!? Last time I looked they were about £50 - that was for a 12" though....I'll have to have a furtle..

Message #8 - Posted 2006/04/06 - X Kyle M Thompson

Mark wrote:

On Wed, 5 Apr 2006 23:59:50 +0100, X Kyle M Thompson wrote (in a previous article):

On Wed, 5 Apr 2006, Mark wrote:

On Wed, 5 Apr 2006 21:04:04 +0100, X Kyle M Thompson wrote (in a previous article):

On Wed, 5 Apr 2006, Peter Ceresole wrote:

X Kyle M Thompson wrote:

Since I do not have a triagular screwdriver I cannot open my old battery to look, but was wondering what the actual cells used in a 14' iBook battery were? If they are something I can get from Maplin/RS et al then I suppose I could make myself a spare?

I think Adrian Tuddenham has looked inside iBook batteries, in the p=

ast,

and revived them. I remember looking inside a dead one and the actual cells are fairly 'normal' looking NiMH ones. AA sized at a guess. Pl=

us a

number of resistors and/or diodes. At that point I gave up but I'm s=

ure

that with a bit more determination it might have been fixable.

Perhaps I'll try and find an appropriate screwdriver and give it a go. Is there anything in there that will give me a shock, I wonder?

How expensive they are if you have to buy a new one?

Oh, I already got one from ebay for GBP20 - nearly a year old, and only at 78% capacity, but cheaper than GBP88 for a new one.

=A320!? Last time I looked they were about =A350 - that was for a 12" though....I'll have to have a furtle.

Lots are buy it now for =A345 with about =A39 postage, occasionally people put them up for real auctions and you can be lucky - if you don't mind a slightly older battery. 4 hour life is better than the couple of minutes I was getting with the old one!

kt.

Message #9 - Posted 2006/04/06 - Peter Ceresole

X Kyle M Thompson wrote:

Perhaps I'll try and find an appropriate screwdriver and give it a go. Is there anything in there that will give me a shock, I wonder?

Only the complication of the wiring and the diodes... No, nothing at all. After all, the whole thing is very low voltage.

Peter

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