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iMac G5 brightness

Message #1 - Posted 2006/02/08 - Gary

I usually sit at the computer with all the house lights down and the brightness set to no squares. I find that at full squares, the backlight nearly sears my eyeballs out.

Even half brightness looks to bright to me.

Am I hampering the colour fidelity of the monitor by running it at a no squares brightness? Will it make it last longer?

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Message #2 - Posted 2006/02/08 - Peter Ceresole

Gary wrote:

Am I hampering the colour fidelity of the monitor by running it at a no squares brightness?

Hard to say but trying it with my 17" iG5, I should say colour fidelity remains pretty good. But heavens, how depressing.

Catseyes Gary huh? Me, I run at max squares at all times and my eyeballs don't seem to overheat. But eyes come in all sensitivities, for all kinds of reasons.

Will it make it last longer?

Very likely; backlights do fade over time and it seems likely that running them dim would extend their life.

Peter

Message #3 - Posted 2006/02/09 - Gary

On Wed, 8 Feb 2006 23:46:39 +0000, Peter Ceresole wrote (in a previous article):

Gary wrote:

Am I hampering the colour fidelity of the monitor by running it at a no squares brightness?

Hard to say but trying it with my 17" iG5, I should say colour fidelity remains pretty good. But heavens, how depressing.

It's depressing that you get good colour fidelity from a monitor the brightness of which doesn't lacerate the retina?!

Catseyes Gary huh? Me, I run at max squares at all times and my eyeballs don't seem to overheat. But eyes come in all sensitivities, for all kinds of reasons.

Flipping heck. If I do this... (F15, 2 seconds) it actually hurts. There is no way I could use this computer at that brightness!

Will it make it last longer?

Very likely; backlights do fade over time and it seems likely that running them dim would extend their life.

Oh well, that's something good to know.

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Message #4 - Posted 2006/02/09 - Peter Ceresole

Gary wrote:

Hard to say but trying it with my 17" iG5, I should say colour fidelity remains pretty good. But heavens, how depressing.

It's depressing that you get good colour fidelity from a monitor the brightness of which doesn't lacerate the retina?!

No. I just find something that dark depressing to look at.

The screen brightness on max is about the same (using a SLR camera as a light meter) as the immediately surrounding desk area, and about a tenth as bright as the view through the window. This is with a lot of, mostly white, text windows open on a blue desktop. Showing an exterior scene on screen is considerably darker. Viewing with the brightness turned down is just... Terribly dark and gloomy.

Are you sure that your iMac's screen is normally set up? --
Peter

Message #5 - Posted 2006/02/09 - Gary

On Thu, 9 Feb 2006 08:56:22 +0000, Peter Ceresole wrote (in a previous article):

No. I just find something that dark depressing to look at.

Oh!

The screen brightness on max is about the same (using a SLR camera as a light meter) as the immediately surrounding desk area, and about a tenth as bright as the view through the window. This is with a lot of, mostly white, text windows open on a blue desktop. Showing an exterior scene on screen is considerably darker. Viewing with the brightness turned down is just... Terribly dark and gloomy.

Are you sure that your iMac's screen is normally set up?

I'm not sure how else it can be set up. I do work mostly with no ambient light at all. In the summer (I can just about remember those) when I have to have the windows open for ventilation then I will turn the brightness up. Normally I use a blackout blind on the window but it hampers the air flow somewhat.

I am using the iMac Calibrated colour profile if that makes a difference.

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Message #6 - Posted 2006/02/09 - Peter Ceresole

Gary wrote:

Are you sure that your iMac's screen is normally set up?

I'm not sure how else it can be set up. I do work mostly with no ambient light at all.

Okay.

That's supposed to be a sure-fire formula for eye strain, you know. Best appears to be to work with ambient at about the level of light from the screen- which can be low, but shouldn't really be black.

But you know what you prefer, so of course you should use that. --
Peter

Message #7 - Posted 2006/02/09 - Jochem Huhmann

peter@cara.demon.co.uk (Peter Ceresole) writes:

Gary wrote:

Are you sure that your iMac's screen is normally set up?

I'm not sure how else it can be set up. I do work mostly with no ambient light at all.

Okay.

That's supposed to be a sure-fire formula for eye strain, you know. Best appears to be to work with ambient at about the level of light from the screen- which can be low, but shouldn't really be black.

Common wisdom says that you should adjust ambient light and monitor settings in a way that a plain (printed) sheet of paper hold next to the monitor has the same brightness as documents on screen. This will at least ensure that your eyes are not constantly busy adjusting to different light levels when looking at the monitor and elsewhere.

That being said, it depends on what you're doing. When you're working *only* with your screen (don't look elsewhere) and have to concentrate really hard (as often in programming, writing or gaming) the tunnel vision created by a bright screen with low ambient light may actually help. When you're doing office work and have to look often at papers or people around this would be a bit straining.

Jochem

"A designer knows he has arrived at perfection not when there is no longer anything to add, but when there is no longer anything to take away." - Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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