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Is the a LIGHT SOCKET to 120v Converter?

Message #1 - Posted 2007/01/20 - Zello Yello

I'm being serious here guys...

Is the a LIGHT SOCKET to 120v Converter?

Some places in the world don't have electrical outlets... just light bulb sockets.

Is there a device that can convert a traditional light bulb socket that a bulb goes into... into a regular 120v outlet that a powerbook can be plugged into?

You know it sounds weird... but Car Adapters are common... wondering if any heard of a light socket adapter?

Message #2 - Posted 2007/01/20 - Joe W DiDomenico

On 2007-01-20 08:12:56 -0500, Zello Yello said:

I'm being serious here guys...

Is the a LIGHT SOCKET to 120v Converter?

Some places in the world don't have electrical outlets... just light bulb sockets.

Is there a device that can convert a traditional light bulb socket that a bulb goes into... into a regular 120v outlet that a powerbook can be plugged into?

You know it sounds weird... but Car Adapters are common... wondering if any heard of a light socket adapter?

Just about any hardware store should carry them.

Joey DoWop Dee

Remember: It is To Laugh.

Message #3 - Posted 2007/01/20 - Dr. ''Q''

Previously, Joe W DiDomenico wrote:

On 2007-01-20 08:12:56 -0500, Zello Yello said:

I'm being serious here guys...

Is the a LIGHT SOCKET to 120v Converter?

Some places in the world don't have electrical outlets... just light bulb sockets.

Is there a device that can convert a traditional light bulb socket that a bulb goes into... into a regular 120v outlet that a powerbook can be plugged into?

You know it sounds weird... but Car Adapters are common... wondering if any heard of a light socket adapter?

Just about any hardware store should carry them.

What's it called... I couldn't even find one on Ebay....

--

Message #4 - Posted 2007/01/20 - Kir?ly

In comp.sys.mac.hardware Dr. ''Q'39; wrote:

Just about any hardware store should carry them.

What's it called... I couldn't even find one on Ebay....

screw-in outlet.
http://www.lightingco.com/catalog/Plug-Screw-in-Outlet-p-17147.html

Any hardware store will have it.

K.

Lang may your lum reek.

Message #5 - Posted 2007/01/20 - D. Kirkpatrick

Previously, Zello Yello wrote:

I'm being serious here guys...

Is the a LIGHT SOCKET to 120v Converter?

Some places in the world don't have electrical outlets... just light bulb sockets.

Is there a device that can convert a traditional light bulb socket that a bulb goes into... into a regular 120v outlet that a powerbook can be plugged into?

See the other threads for answer.

Most computers have a 3-prong plug however so you will also need a non-grounding plug adapter as well to piggyback onto it.

However without the earth ground you make touching the computer and other nearby appliances or pipes a danger for electrical shock.

Also with respect to "Some places in the world...", USA and Canada operate on 110-120 VAC 60 HZ as the electrical standard.

When in Europe most places are 220 VAC 50 HZ. As such the adapter is a whole other animal.

Message #6 - Posted 2007/01/20 - B'ichela

Previously, Zello Yello wrote:

I'm being serious here guys...

Is the a LIGHT SOCKET to 120v Converter?

Some places in the world don't have electrical outlets... just light bulb sockets.

Is there a device that can convert a traditional light bulb socket that a bulb goes into... into a regular 120v outlet that a powerbook can be plugged into?

Check your local hardware/homecenter store. people use these things all of the time, eg: outdoor christmas lights.
Note! these do NOT have an earth pin (ground) thefore if you need to plug a 3pin plug into one of those... you will need an adaptor.
Now some countries use a different style socket than the standard medium base screw socket. those adaptors to medium base screw sockets may be found on the internet.

--

From the Desk of the Sysop of:
Planet Maca's Opus, a Free open BBS system. telnet://pinkrose.dhis.org Web Site: http://pinkrose.dhis.org, Dialup 860-618-3091 300-33600 bps The New Cnews maintainer
B'ichela

Message #7 - Posted 2007/01/20 - John Johnson

Previously, D. Kirkpatrick wrote:

[question and good info snipped]

Also with respect to "Some places in the world...", USA and Canada operate on 110-120 VAC 60 HZ as the electrical standard.

When in Europe most places are 220 VAC 50 HZ. As such the adapter is a whole other animal.

All recent macs have auto-switching power supplies rated for 50-60Hz, 120-220V. The supply for my Aluminum PB, for example claims 100-240V, 50-60Hz.

Later,
John

johajohn@indianahoosiers.edu

'indiana' is a 'nolnn' and 'hoosier' is a 'solkk'. Indiana doesn't solkk.

Message #8 - Posted 2007/01/21 - D. Kirkpatrick

Previously, John Johnson wrote:

All recent macs have auto-switching power supplies rated for 50-60Hz, 120-220V. The supply for my Aluminum PB, for example claims 100-240V, 50-60Hz.

Any rear panel switches?

Even so, the plug style is quite different.

Message #9 - Posted 2007/01/21 - John Johnson

Previously, D. Kirkpatrick wrote:

Previously, John Johnson wrote:

All recent macs have auto-switching power supplies rated for 50-60Hz, 120-220V. The supply for my Aluminum PB, for example claims 100-240V, 50-60Hz.

Any rear panel switches?

No, it's a power-brick for my PowerBook. I don't think that Apple's provided a manually-switched power supply for 10 years (I do recall that they used to provide manually-switched power supplies in their desktops, but I think that they went to auto-switching in the early '90s).

Even so, the plug style is quite different.

Quite correct. However, the OP is planning (if I understand the situation correctly) on purchasing an adapter that screws into a light socket. Provided they purchase the correct adapter (i.e. purchase it in the country where their computer was sold), and provided that the light sockets where they go to are the same, then it will connect. That's not the limit of potential problems (exceeding maximum current load on the circuit is an obvious possibility), but it's about the limit of the ones that we can do anything about from the far side of the internet.

Later,
John

johajohn@indianahoosiers.edu

'indiana' is a 'nolnn' and 'hoosier' is a 'solkk'. Indiana doesn't solkk.

Message #10 - Posted 2007/01/21 - Matthew T. Russotto

Previously, Zello Yello wrote:

I'm being serious here guys...

Is the a LIGHT SOCKET to 120v Converter?

Yes.

Some places in the world don't have electrical outlets... just light bulb sockets.

Like prisons.

Is there a device that can convert a traditional light bulb socket that a bulb goes into... into a regular 120v outlet that a powerbook can be plugged into?

You can buy them at the hardware store, but they're not going to allow you to take either them or the powerbook into the cell.

There's no such thing as a free lunch, but certain accounting practices can result in a fully-depreciated one.

Message #11 - Posted 2007/01/23 - Clever Monkey

D. Kirkpatrick wrote:

Previously, John Johnson wrote:

All recent macs have auto-switching power supplies rated for 50-60Hz, 120-220V. The supply for my Aluminum PB, for example claims 100-240V, 50-60Hz.

Any rear panel switches?

No. The power supplies are auto-switching.

Even so, the plug style is quite different.

You have to replace the cord. The end of the cord that plugs into the "mains" is different.

Message #12 - Posted 2007/01/26 -

Zello Yello wrote:

I'm being serious here guys...

Is the a LIGHT SOCKET to 120v Converter?

Some places in the world don't have electrical outlets... just light bulb sockets.

Is there a device that can convert a traditional light bulb socket that a bulb goes into... into a regular 120v outlet that a powerbook can be plugged into?

You know it sounds weird... but Car Adapters are common... wondering if any heard of a light socket adapter?

I bought one, for my porch light socket, that has dual polarized 120VAC outlets, PLUS the bulb screws into the bottom, so the light still works! And, there is a pull chain switch!

Walmart, K mart, Target, Home Depot, Lowes, Ace hardware all carry them, in dark brown, or white! Less than $2.00!

http://lowes.com and search it:

Item # 72574
Model # 718B-SP-L

http://images.lowes.com/product/converted/032664/032664270604sm.jpg

AND,

Cooper Wiring Devices
Medium Base Pullchain Socket Adapter with Two Polarized Outlets

Item #: 72575 Model: 718V-SP-L
$1.93
Contact store for availability details.

Message #13 - Posted 2007/01/26 - John Johnson

Previously, Linuxiac <"at yahoo.com "> wrote:

Zello Yello wrote:

I'm being serious here guys...

Is the a LIGHT SOCKET to 120v Converter?

Some places in the world don't have electrical outlets... just light bulb sockets.

Is there a device that can convert a traditional light bulb socket that a bulb goes into... into a regular 120v outlet that a powerbook can be plugged into?

You know it sounds weird... but Car Adapters are common... wondering if any heard of a light socket adapter?

I bought one, for my porch light socket, that has dual polarized 120VAC outlets, PLUS the bulb screws into the bottom, so the light still works! And, there is a pull chain switch!

They're handy but (as with any other "octopus" device such as outlet multipliers) be careful not to overload the circuit that you're using. Swapping out a 60W lamp to plug in your 60W PowerBook is no problem. Adding your 60W PowerBook to the load of a circuit might very well push the wiring or the fuse/breaker over the limit. Wiping out a fuse is a bit of an irritation, but melting wiring or burning your house down is a problem of a different sort, and a significant danger to those in the area.

Later,
John

johajohn@indianahoosiers.edu

'indiana' is a 'nolnn' and 'hoosier' is a 'solkk'. Indiana doesn't solkk.

Message #14 - Posted 2007/01/26 - You

Previously, John Johnson wrote:

They're handy but (as with any other "octopus" device such as outlet multipliers) be careful not to overload the circuit that you're using. Swapping out a 60W lamp to plug in your 60W PowerBook is no problem. Adding your 60W PowerBook to the load of a circuit might very well push the wiring or the fuse/breaker over the limit. Wiping out a fuse is a bit of an irritation, but melting wiring or burning your house down is a problem of a different sort, and a significant danger to those in the area.

--
Later,
John

Now lets really look at the problem from an Electrical Current point of view, here. 60 Watts@ 120Vac = .5 Amps. What is the MINIMUM Breaker, or Fuse used on a Standard Household System? I have seen 10 Amp Breakers, but mostly 15 amp Breakers for typical Household Circuits.

Now adding .5 amps to a 15 AMP Breaker,or even a 10 Amp Breaker, really isn't going to overload ANY circuit. The wiring, being a minimum of 14 Ga. is good for at least 30 Amps, so the Breaker is the Limiting Factor, as it should be under the NEC.

Which means that the above is mostly a NON-Issue........

Message #15 - Posted 2007/01/26 - andrewunix

Fri, 26 Jan 2007 19:40:59 GMT, You@shadow.orgs suggested:

Now lets really look at the problem from an Electrical Current point of view, here. 60 Watts@ 120Vac = .5 Amps. What is the MINIMUM Breaker, or Fuse used on a Standard Household System? I have seen 10 Amp Breakers, but mostly 15 amp Breakers for typical Household Circuits.

Now adding .5 amps to a 15 AMP Breaker,or even a 10 Amp Breaker, really isn't going to overload ANY circuit. The wiring, being a minimum of 14 Ga. is good for at least 30 Amps, so the Breaker is the Limiting Factor, as it should be under the NEC.

Which means that the above is mostly a NON-Issue........

Of course, this is assuming that the wiring is up to code and the circuit breakers or fuses are in proper working order. In older homes this is often not the case.

agreenbu @ nyx . net andrew michael greenburg

Message #16 - Posted 2007/01/26 - John Johnson

Previously, You wrote:

Previously, John Johnson wrote:

They're handy but (as with any other "octopus" device such as outlet multipliers) be careful not to overload the circuit that you're using. Swapping out a 60W lamp to plug in your 60W PowerBook is no problem. Adding your 60W PowerBook to the load of a circuit might very well push the wiring or the fuse/breaker over the limit. Wiping out a fuse is a bit of an irritation, but melting wiring or burning your house down is a problem of a different sort, and a significant danger to those in the area.

--
Later,
John

Now lets really look at the problem from an Electrical Current point of view, here. 60 Watts@ 120Vac = .5 Amps. What is the MINIMUM Breaker, or Fuse used on a Standard Household System? I have seen 10 Amp Breakers, but mostly 15 amp Breakers for typical Household Circuits.

Now adding .5 amps to a 15 AMP Breaker,or even a 10 Amp Breaker, really isn't going to overload ANY circuit. The wiring, being a minimum of 14 Ga. is good for at least 30 Amps, so the Breaker is the Limiting Factor, as it should be under the NEC.

Which means that the above is mostly a NON-Issue........

Yup, mostly a NON-issue. I'll agree 100% with that. However, the guy who started this thread was talking about using this adapter in places where there were only light sockets, and no electrical outlets.

In these places, the concept of "electrical code" might not mean very much at all. Some houses in the US that I've been in certainly hadn't heard of the NEC. Hell, I had a "professional" miswire a projector I was running, and smoked the hell out of it. I was only barely able to get it running again in time for the show, and got really lucky that it was fixable. I caught some flack for that, though my boss was (all things considered) pretty light about it because I did get it fixed quickly and inexpensively.

So you'll pardon me for not taking things like the presence of fuses or properly-sized wiring for granted (and I check the wiring myself now, too).

To make the independent and technically-aware happier, preface my original advice with "everyone here is obviously smart enough for this advice to be useless, and bordering on patronizing, but because I provided advice and because we live in such degenerate times that legal liability is an issue, I have chosen to spell things out clearly. Feel free to dismiss me as an over-anxious worry-wart or even an overly-paternal nanny-stater."

I still don't want anyone to melt down a wiring set or pop a fuse in a place where you might not be able to get any for a week or two, and a reminder to be careful about overloading circuits seemed like a low-effort way of keeping things safe. Sorry for any inconvenience.

--
Later,
John

johajohn@indianahoosiers.edu

'indiana' is a 'nolnn' and 'hoosier' is a 'solkk'. Indiana doesn't solkk.

Message #17 - Posted 2007/01/27 - Robert Haar

On 1/26/07 8:20 AM, "Linuxiac" <"at yahoo.com "> wrote:

Zello Yello wrote:

I'm being serious here guys...

Is the a LIGHT SOCKET to 120v Converter?

Some places in the world don't have electrical outlets... just light bulb sockets.

I bought one, for my porch light socket, that has dual polarized 120VAC outlets, PLUS the bulb screws into the bottom, so the light still works! And, there is a pull chain switch!

This kind of device might do the trick, but here are two possible issues. First, these adaptors provide only a 2 prong outlet. There is no ground connection available through the light socket. Second, the OP referred to "around the world." The physical configuration and voltages of light sockets does vary. Don't expect to be able to carry one adaptor for use everywhere.

Message #18 - Posted 2007/02/10 - John Burke

On 2007-01-20 05:12:56 -0800, Zello Yello said:

I'm being serious here guys...

Is the a LIGHT SOCKET to 120v Converter?

Some places in the world don't have electrical outlets... just light bulb sockets.

Is there a device that can convert a traditional light bulb socket that a bulb goes into... into a regular 120v outlet that a powerbook can be plugged into?

You know it sounds weird... but Car Adapters are common... wondering if any heard of a light socket adapter?

YEP, IN YOU LOCAK HARDWARE STORE. I USE THEM ALLL THE TIME. It is a screw type base to 110 plug about 99 cents

John

Message #19 - Posted 2007/02/11 -

No Problem,in Thirth World Countries You see them a lot. BUT,don't you worry about the voltage for Your laptop,it'll take any juice from 100 to 240 volts-50-60 Hz.
It's an switched Powersupply and those have a wide input range of Voltage!!! Cheers

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