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Old PowerBook battery disposal

Message #1 - Posted 2003/07/21 - Bella Jones

My old PB 150 is dead, and I'm having a clearout. I know I should not chuck the battery in the kitchen bin. Should I just take it to a Mac place for them to dispose of?

Thanks

Bella

Message #2 - Posted 2003/07/22 - Bella Jones

in article 1fyh6bk.k9bmc7105kyysN%flavio_matanitakethisbitout@mac.com, Flavio Matani at flavio_matanitakethisbitout@mac.com wrote on 22/7/03 1:50 am:

Bella Jones wrote:

My old PB 150 is dead, and I'm having a clearout. I know I should not chuck the battery in the kitchen bin. Should I just take it to a Mac place for them to dispose of?

it is possible that this guy

http://www.pbfanatic.co.uk/

might have a use for the pb or the battery, since he deals in old powerbooks

if he;s still there

Thanks! He's still up and running - but the one thing he never mentions is old batteries. I could offer the PB150 to him for butchery, but there are things on the HD which I would not want to let out of here! Am picking it apart for fun, and also symbolic 'moving on' ceremony. :-)

Will make some kind of ironic fridge magnet type display with the keys, (and Blue Tack?!) which I have already picked off...

Message #3 - Posted 2003/07/22 - Bella Jones

in article BB4352F0.948E%mike.2871DELETE_ME@btinternet.com, Mike at mike.2871DELETE_ME@btinternet.com wrote on 22/7/03 8:45 pm:

On 21/7/03 11:36 pm, in article BB42299A.159CC%bellajonez@yahoo.co.uk, Bella Jones wrote:

My old PB 150 is dead, and I'm having a clearout. I know I should not chuck the battery in the kitchen bin. Should I just take it to a Mac place for them to dispose of?

Thanks

Bella

Interestingly the lithion-ion batteries are non-toxic and safe when fully discharged. When not fully discharged they can be a serious fire hazard if interfered with. So it depends on the chemistry of the battery.

This battery is dead and unused for years. Called one mac place in W1 and they didnπt know what to do with it! Emailed the PB guy from Flavio's post but no reply yet. Will call council I think. Could casually drop it off at City Hall and cause a huge scare... :-)

Message #4 - Posted 2003/07/27 - Bella Jones

in article BB437494.15AE0%bellajonez@yahoo.co.uk, Bella Jones at bellajonez@yahoo.co.uk wrote on 22/7/03 11:09 pm:

My old PB 150 is dead, and I'm having a clearout. I know I should not chuck the battery in the kitchen bin. Should I just take it to a Mac place for them to dispose of?

Thanks

Bella

Interestingly the lithion-ion batteries are non-toxic and safe when fully discharged. When not fully discharged they can be a serious fire hazard if interfered with. So it depends on the chemistry of the battery.

This battery is dead and unused for years. Called one mac place in W1 and they didnπt know what to do with it! Emailed the PB guy from Flavio's post but no reply yet. Will call council I think. Could casually drop it off at City Hall and cause a huge scare... :-)

Own post reply -just for info.

Answer: no one knows! not even that powerbook guy. The council don't have a special place for batteries, but the guy I spoke to told me that Westminster incinerate most of their stuff; not landfill. So I'll take a punt. It's been sitting in the kitchen too long waiting to do mischief. And esp as the fire brigade were called the other night after a smoke alarm in someone's flat went off. No smoke or flames that I could see, but some shouting.

Message #5 - Posted 2003/07/27 - Mike

On 27/7/03 7:21 pm, in article BB49D6CA.15F07%bellajonez@yahoo.co.uk, Bella Jones wrote:

in article BB437494.15AE0%bellajonez@yahoo.co.uk, Bella Jones at bellajonez@yahoo.co.uk wrote on 22/7/03 11:09 pm:

My old PB 150 is dead, and I'm having a clearout. I know I should not chuck the battery in the kitchen bin. Should I just take it to a Mac place for them to dispose of?

Thanks

Bella

Interestingly the lithion-ion batteries are non-toxic and safe when fully discharged. When not fully discharged they can be a serious fire hazard if interfered with. So it depends on the chemistry of the battery.

This battery is dead and unused for years. Called one mac place in W1 and they didnπt know what to do with it! Emailed the PB guy from Flavio's post but no reply yet. Will call council I think. Could casually drop it off at City Hall and cause a huge scare... :-)

Own post reply -just for info.

Answer: no one knows! not even that powerbook guy. The council don't have a special place for batteries, but the guy I spoke to told me that Westminster incinerate most of their stuff; not landfill. So I'll take a punt. It's been sitting in the kitchen too long waiting to do mischief. And esp as the fire brigade were called the other night after a smoke alarm in someone's flat went off. No smoke or flames that I could see, but some shouting.

Problem is, it's a scientific awareness problem. For years we only had lead acid batteries, everyone knows both lead and acid are unhealthy so together.... Then along comes NiCAD and again those in the business know that cadnium is a heavy and toxic metal. Now we have Li-Ion which when discharged is non toxic umm... It's not in many business's interest to publish that fact.

The poor guys down at the tip aren't chemists, and let's face it if they can charge you for disposing your toxic battteries their gonna charge for ALL batteries. Surely you don't expect them to inspect every battery with a magnifying glass to determine its composition!

Oh.... Just to add to the misery, I believe a EU regulation is due in that now classifies CRTs as hazardous so its gonna cost to get rid of your monitors and TVs

Message #6 - Posted 2003/07/27 - Bella Jones

in article BB49E307.A2F6%mike.2871DELETE_ME@btinternet.com, Mike at mike.2871DELETE_ME@btinternet.com wrote on 27/7/03 8:13 pm:

[snip dispose of powerbook battery]

This battery is dead and unused for years. Called one mac place in W1 and they didnπt know what to do with it! Emailed the PB guy from Flavio's post but no reply yet. Will call council I think. Could casually drop it off at City Hall and cause a huge scare... :-)

Own post reply -just for info.

Answer: no one knows! not even that powerbook guy. The council don't have a special place for batteries, but the guy I spoke to told me that Westminster incinerate most of their stuff; not landfill. So I'll take a punt. It's been sitting in the kitchen too long waiting to do mischief. And esp as the fire brigade were called the other night after a smoke alarm in someone's flat went off. No smoke or flames that I could see, but some shouting.

Problem is, it's a scientific awareness problem. For years we only had lead acid batteries, everyone knows both lead and acid are unhealthy so together.... Then along comes NiCAD and again those in the business know that cadnium is a heavy and toxic metal. Now we have Li-Ion which when discharged is non toxic umm... It's not in many business's interest to publish that fact.

Ah, of course... So I can dispose of this one with a fairly clear conscience.

The poor guys down at the tip aren't chemists, and let's face it if they can charge you for disposing your toxic battteries their gonna charge for ALL batteries. Surely you don't expect them to inspect every battery with a magnifying glass to determine its composition!

Oh.... Just to add to the misery, I believe a EU regulation is due in that now classifies CRTs as hazardous so its gonna cost to get rid of your monitors and TVs

But hopefully not if for recycling purposes?

Good ole EU, see the fairly recent directive banning most forms of cosmetic tooth whitening...

Message #7 - Posted 2003/07/27 - Woody

Peter Ceresole wrote:

Previously, Bella Jones wrote:

Oh.... Just to add to the misery, I believe a EU regulation is due in that now classifies CRTs as hazardous so its gonna cost to get rid of your monitors and TVs

But hopefully not if for recycling purposes?

Presumably, if they're properly recycled it will cost you whatever it costs. Or you will make whatever money somebody will give you, for whatever purpose they can find for an old CRT.

The point is that the directive makes sense. There are harmful chemicals and non-biodegradable materials in CRTs. We used to throw them away because people are ignorant messy pups who would rather poison the environment than pay what it costs to protect it. Now that will become more difficult. Good.

All I hope is that the idiot Brits get their heads round this and develop the capability to handle the waste- as opposed to their stupidity over the fridge directive, where they saw it coming and unlike other EU members did absolutely nothing, and finished up with the only fridge mountain.

No, it will just be put in the 'bloody foriegners, telling us what to do' catagory.

Woody

Message #8 - Posted 2003/07/28 - Bella Jones

in article BB49F6AB966837BDE8@192.168.0.3, Peter Ceresole at peter@cara.demon.co.uk wrote on 27/7/03 9:37 pm:

Oh.... Just to add to the misery, I believe a EU regulation is due in that now classifies CRTs as hazardous so its gonna cost to get rid of your monitors and TVs

But hopefully not if for recycling purposes?

Presumably, if they're properly recycled it will cost you whatever it costs. Or you will make whatever money somebody will give you, for whatever purpose they can find for an old CRT.

The point is that the directive makes sense. There are harmful chemicals and non-biodegradable materials in CRTs. We used to throw them away because people are ignorant messy pups who would rather poison the environment than pay what it costs to protect it.

More education needed, and an understanding that people have responsibilities. That's the hardest thing to teach.

Now that will become more difficult. Good.

All I hope is that the idiot Brits get their heads round this and develop the capability to handle the waste- as opposed to their stupidity over the fridge directive, where they saw it coming and unlike other EU members did absolutely nothing, and finished up with the only fridge mountain.

I agree. But then I wonder if this will incite sellers and manufacturers to factor some of this into their offers in the first place. Ie money off if you take it to a particular recyling place afterwards, or something...

Good ole EU, see the fairly recent directive banning most forms of cosmetic tooth whitening...

On health grounds, that seems soundly based too.

Oh yes, very likely. It's just that I keep thinking about all the things that an EU directive could really help with, such as treatment for mental illness etc etc.

Message #9 - Posted 2003/07/28 - Flavio Matani

Bella Jones wrote:

The point is that the directive makes sense. There are harmful chemicals and non-biodegradable materials in CRTs. We used to throw them away because people are ignorant messy pups who would rather poison the environment than pay what it costs to protect it.

More education needed, and an understanding that people have responsibilities. That's the hardest thing to teach.

very true....

Now that will become more difficult. Good.

All I hope is that the idiot Brits get their heads round this and develop the capability to handle the waste- as opposed to their stupidity over the fridge directive, where they saw it coming and unlike other EU members did absolutely nothing, and finished up with the only fridge mountain.

I agree. But then I wonder if this will incite sellers and manufacturers to factor some of this into their offers in the first place. Ie money off if you take it to a particular recyling place afterwards, or something...

i'm perhaps not totally awake yet, i'm trying to think how this could happen and be implemented ...

flavio matani
guitar tuition and performing homepage.mac.com/flavio_matani/guitar/

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