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Overheating PowerMac G5 - 160F normal?

Message #1 - Posted 2005/10/05 - Fraser Rolfe

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Greetings, all

I work for a small design shop, where we have four PowerMac G5 machines, each running dual 2GHz CPUs. Two of machines run at what we consider to be ånormalπ temperatures - the low 40s Centigrade (about 100F). The other two machinesπ sensors report CPU temperatures of over 70 degrees Centigrade (160F plus), after about 60 minutes of use. While it does not appear to cause any system instability, I am worried that this high operating temperature will shorten the lives of these two machines.

We have had one machine taken away to have its motherboard replaced, but this has had no effect on its operating temperature. As an interim measure, we have desk fans blowing into the front grilles of these two machines ≠ this keeps the temps down around 40C/100F.

Is there any way of ramping up the speed of the CPU fans or lowering the temperature at which they ramp up? They are turning (slowly) but not pushing much air. Oddly, the fans in the two cooler machines run very slowly too. Could it be that the hot machinesπ chips are not up to scratch, or maybe their heat-sinks are not properly seated?

I would really appreciate any thoughts.

Cheers
Fraser

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<TITLE>Overheating PowerMac G5 - 160F normal?</TITLE> </HEAD>
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<FONT FACE=3D"Verdana, Helvetica, Arial"><SPAN STYLE=3D'font-size:12.0px'>Greet= ings, all<BR>
<BR>
I work for a small design shop, where we have four PowerMac G5 machines, ea= ch running dual 2GHz CPUs. Two of machines run at what we consider to be &#8= 216;normal&#8217; temperatures - the low 40s Centigrade (about 100F). The ot= her two machines&#8217; sensors report CPU temperatures of over 70 degrees C= entigrade (160F plus), after about 60 minutes of use. While it does not appe= ar to cause any system instability, I am worried that this high operating te= mperature will shorten the lives of these two machines.<BR> &nbsp;<BR>
We have had one machine taken away to have its motherboard replaced, but th= is has had no effect on its operating temperature. As an interim measure, we= have desk fans blowing into the front grilles of these two machines &#8211;= this keeps the temps down around 40C/100F.<BR> &nbsp;<BR>
Is there any way of ramping up the speed of the CPU fans or lowering the te= mperature at which they ramp up? They are turning (slowly) but not pushing m= uch air. Oddly, the fans in the two cooler machines run very slowly too. Cou= ld it be that the hot machines&#8217; chips are not up to scratch, or maybe = their heat-sinks are not properly seated?<BR> <BR>
I would really appreciate any thoughts.<BR>
<BR>
Cheers<BR>
Fraser</SPAN></FONT>
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Message #2 - Posted 2005/10/05 - Elijah Baley

Previously, Fraser Rolfe wrote:

Greetings, all

I work for a small design shop, where we have four PowerMac G5 machines, each running dual 2GHz CPUs. Two of machines run at what we consider to be ånormalπ temperatures - the low 40s Centigrade (about 100F). The other two machinesπ sensors report CPU temperatures of over 70 degrees Centigrade (160F plus), after about 60 minutes of use. While it does not appear to cause any system instability, I am worried that this high operating temperature will shorten the lives of these two machines.

We have had one machine taken away to have its motherboard replaced, but this has had no effect on its operating temperature. As an interim measure, we have desk fans blowing into the front grilles of these two machines ≠ this keeps the temps down around 40C/100F.

Is there any way of ramping up the speed of the CPU fans or lowering the temperature at which they ramp up? They are turning (slowly) but not pushing much air. Oddly, the fans in the two cooler machines run very slowly too. Could it be that the hot machinesπ chips are not up to scratch, or maybe their heat-sinks are not properly seated?

I would really appreciate any thoughts.

Cheers
Fraser

The latest version of Hardware Monitor (v 3.01) specifies an upper limit for the CPU die temperatures of 88∞C/190.4∞F. A temperature of 70∞C would fall well within the acceptable range.

http://www.bresink.de/osx/HardwareMonitor.html

My personal opinion is that you are fretting over nothing. The design of the G5 towers includes routines that will protect the machine in the event of real overheating.

"There are no significant bugs in our released software that any significant number of users want fixed." Bill Gates

Source: Focus Magazine, nr.43, pages 206-212, (October 23, 1995)

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