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power cord

Message #1 - Posted 2013/07/19 - bob smith

I have a Macbook Pro and an older Macbook. I only have one L-shaped power connector at the moment so I use it to power them both. I switch between them.

Anyone know why it is that when I switch sometimes it works sometimes it doesn't?

A lot of times when I switch, the LED on the L-shaped connector doesn't come on? Can the power cord really be that complicated?

Thanks.

Message #2 - Posted 2013/07/20 - dorayme

Previously, bob smith wrote:

I have a Macbook Pro and an older Macbook. I only have one L-shaped power connector at the moment so I use it to power them both. I switch between them.

Anyone know why it is that when I switch sometimes it works sometimes it doesn't?

A lot of times when I switch, the LED on the L-shaped connector doesn't come on? Can the power cord really be that complicated?

These ends are a bit delicate, they develop faults after constant use and bending. It may be on the way out? Does it show charging on the Macbook itself (you can tell from info on screen).

dorayme

Message #3 - Posted 2013/07/22 - Patty Winter

Previously, bob smith wrote:

I have a Macbook Pro and an older Macbook. I only have one L-shaped power connector at the moment so I use it to power them both. I switch between them.

Anyone know why it is that when I switch sometimes it works sometimes it doesn't?

My first guess would be a fraying wire inside the cable. It has a MagSafe connector, right? So it comes out easily. Still, if you've been pulling on the cable instead of the connector, that could strain the wiring. Or has the cable been getting bent a lot?

Does it go on and off if you jiggle the cable?

Patty

Message #4 - Posted 2013/07/22 - Doug Anderson

bob smith <bob@coolfone.comze.com> writes:

I have a Macbook Pro and an older Macbook. I only have one L-shaped power connector at the moment so I use it to power them both. I switch between them.

Anyone know why it is that when I switch sometimes it works sometimes it doesn't?

A lot of times when I switch, the LED on the L-shaped connector doesn't come on? Can the power cord really be that complicated?

I had this problem.

I often carry my Macbook in my messenger back, which isn't always pristine.

Turned out that the magnets on my Macbook power input (the same ones that hold the cord in) had picked up some little particles of iron (or something similar). They were preventing the connector from seating all the way in, and then the connector would only work intermittently.

Sometimes the light would light up and the computer would charge, other times not.

It was a little tricky to extract the particles once I identified the problem. I could see them - like little grains of sand, but since they were held in by the magnetism, I couldn't shake them out or anything.

Of course your problem may be something else, but start by peering in carefully with a magnifying glass, and see if anything is in the power port of your MacBook that doesn't seem to belong there!

Message #5 - Posted 2013/07/22 - Don Bruder

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

bob smith <bob@coolfone.comze.com> writes:

I have a Macbook Pro and an older Macbook. I only have one L-shaped power connector at the moment so I use it to power them both. I switch between them.

Anyone know why it is that when I switch sometimes it works sometimes it doesn't?

A lot of times when I switch, the LED on the L-shaped connector doesn't come on? Can the power cord really be that complicated?

I had this problem.

I often carry my Macbook in my messenger back, which isn't always pristine.

Turned out that the magnets on my Macbook power input (the same ones that hold the cord in) had picked up some little particles of iron (or something similar). They were preventing the connector from seating all the way in, and then the connector would only work intermittently.

Sometimes the light would light up and the computer would charge, other times not.

It was a little tricky to extract the particles once I identified the problem. I could see them - like little grains of sand, but since they were held in by the magnetism, I couldn't shake them out or anything.

If/when you hit this situation again, spend a buck in the toy aisle of your favorite store - get yourself a blob of silly-putty. Mash it (slow and gentle) onto/into the connector, then "snap" it away as sharply as you can. Repeat 2-3 times, as it's doubtful you'll get *EVERYTHING* the first time, but with multiple operations, you should get the vast majority of the specks to part company with the magnets. When lifting it away, you want to be sure to try to use a sharp "jerk", rather than a slow "peel" - It'll behave kinda like the cornstarch & water mixes you can see on youtube - hit it hard and fast, and it acts like a solid - work it slow and gentle, and it'll behave more like a liquid.

If the door is baroque don't be Haydn. Come around Bach and jiggle the Handel.

Message #6 - Posted 2013/07/22 - Doug Anderson

Don Bruder <Don@sonic.net> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

bob smith <bob@coolfone.comze.com> writes:

I have a Macbook Pro and an older Macbook. I only have one L-shaped power connector at the moment so I use it to power them both. I switch between them.

Anyone know why it is that when I switch sometimes it works sometimes it doesn't?

A lot of times when I switch, the LED on the L-shaped connector doesn't come on? Can the power cord really be that complicated?

I had this problem.

I often carry my Macbook in my messenger back, which isn't always pristine.

Turned out that the magnets on my Macbook power input (the same ones that hold the cord in) had picked up some little particles of iron (or something similar). They were preventing the connector from seating all the way in, and then the connector would only work intermittently.

Sometimes the light would light up and the computer would charge, other times not.

It was a little tricky to extract the particles once I identified the problem. I could see them - like little grains of sand, but since they were held in by the magnetism, I couldn't shake them out or anything.

If/when you hit this situation again, spend a buck in the toy aisle of your favorite store - get yourself a blob of silly-putty. Mash it (slow and gentle) onto/into the connector, then "snap" it away as sharply as you can. Repeat 2-3 times, as it's doubtful you'll get *EVERYTHING* the first time, but with multiple operations, you should get the vast majority of the specks to part company with the magnets. When lifting it away, you want to be sure to try to use a sharp "jerk", rather than a slow "peel" - It'll behave kinda like the cornstarch & water mixes you can see on youtube - hit it hard and fast, and it acts like a solid - work it slow and gentle, and it'll behave more like a liquid.

This is a terrifying suggestion, but certainly more fun than tweezers, toothpicks and shishkebab skewers which was my actual solution!

Message #7 - Posted 2013/07/22 - Patty Winter

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

It was a little tricky to extract the particles once I identified the problem. I could see them - like little grains of sand, but since they were held in by the magnetism, I couldn't shake them out or anything.

Wouldn't a small magnet have done the job?

Patty

Message #8 - Posted 2013/07/22 - Doug Anderson

Patty Winter <patty1@wintertime.com> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

It was a little tricky to extract the particles once I identified the problem. I could see them - like little grains of sand, but since they were held in by the magnetism, I couldn't shake them out or anything.

Wouldn't a small magnet have done the job?

It would have to be both small enough to get into the power port of the MacBook, and more powerful than the fairly powerful magnets built in there. I own many magnets, but none that meet both criteria, though they must exist.

Message #9 - Posted 2013/07/22 - Don Bruder

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

Don Bruder <Don@sonic.net> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

bob smith <bob@coolfone.comze.com> writes:

I have a Macbook Pro and an older Macbook. I only have one L-shaped power
connector at the moment so I use it to power them both. I switch between
them.

Anyone know why it is that when I switch sometimes it works sometimes it
doesn't?

A lot of times when I switch, the LED on the L-shaped connector doesn't come on? Can the power cord really be that complicated?

I had this problem.

I often carry my Macbook in my messenger back, which isn't always pristine.

Turned out that the magnets on my Macbook power input (the same ones that hold the cord in) had picked up some little particles of iron (or something similar). They were preventing the connector from seating all the way in, and then the connector would only work intermittently.

Sometimes the light would light up and the computer would charge, other times not.

It was a little tricky to extract the particles once I identified the problem. I could see them - like little grains of sand, but since they were held in by the magnetism, I couldn't shake them out or anything.

If/when you hit this situation again, spend a buck in the toy aisle of your favorite store - get yourself a blob of silly-putty. Mash it (slow and gentle) onto/into the connector, then "snap" it away as sharply as you can. Repeat 2-3 times, as it's doubtful you'll get *EVERYTHING* the first time, but with multiple operations, you should get the vast majority of the specks to part company with the magnets. When lifting it away, you want to be sure to try to use a sharp "jerk", rather than a slow "peel" - It'll behave kinda like the cornstarch & water mixes you can see on youtube - hit it hard and fast, and it acts like a solid - work it slow and gentle, and it'll behave more like a liquid.

This is a terrifying suggestion, but certainly more fun than tweezers, toothpicks and shishkebab skewers which was my actual solution!

Terrifying??? OK, I'll ask... Why?

If the door is baroque don't be Haydn. Come around Bach and jiggle the Handel.

Message #10 - Posted 2013/07/22 - Doug Anderson

Don Bruder <Don@sonic.net> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

This is a terrifying suggestion, but certainly more fun than tweezers, toothpicks and shishkebab skewers which was my actual solution!

Terrifying??? OK, I'll ask... Why?

The idea of silly putty gumming up the power port is really not a nice one. Ever try to get silly putty out of, say, fabric (once it has the chance to soak in).

Message #11 - Posted 2013/07/23 - Don Bruder

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

Don Bruder <Don@sonic.net> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

This is a terrifying suggestion, but certainly more fun than tweezers, toothpicks and shishkebab skewers which was my actual solution!

Terrifying??? OK, I'll ask... Why?

The idea of silly putty gumming up the power port is really not a nice one. Ever try to get silly putty out of, say, fabric (once it has the chance to soak in).

Sure, getting it out of fabric once it gets mooshed in is a bad scene. But we're not talking about fabric here. Smooth metal and plastic doesn't even try to "hold onto" it.

If the door is baroque don't be Haydn. Come around Bach and jiggle the Handel.

Message #12 - Posted 2013/07/23 - Doug Anderson

Don Bruder <Don@sonic.net> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

Don Bruder <Don@sonic.net> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

This is a terrifying suggestion, but certainly more fun than tweezers, toothpicks and shishkebab skewers which was my actual solution!

Terrifying??? OK, I'll ask... Why?

The idea of silly putty gumming up the power port is really not a nice one. Ever try to get silly putty out of, say, fabric (once it has the chance to soak in).

Sure, getting it out of fabric once it gets mooshed in is a bad scene. But we're not talking about fabric here. Smooth metal and plastic doesn't even try to "hold onto" it.

I can imagine that is true, but there is some texture in this port (four little pins, and so forth). So it isn't like sticking silly putty on the top of a case to remove a stain or something.

But yes, I'll keep this trick in mind if the lesser interventions I've used seem inadequate!

Message #13 - Posted 2013/07/24 - Iceman

On 22 Jul 2013 22:26:26 -0700, Doug Anderson wrote in message <news:3c4nbl7sot.fsf@ethel.the.log>:

The idea of silly putty gumming up the power port is really not a nice one. Ever try to get silly putty out of, say, fabric (once it has the chance to soak in).

Silly-putty in computer sockets -- I think ve-e-e-ry bad idea.

Message #14 - Posted 2013/07/25 - John McWilliams

On 7/24/13 PDT 10:24 AM, Iceman wrote:

On 22 Jul 2013 22:26:26 -0700, Doug Anderson wrote in message <news:3c4nbl7sot.fsf@ethel.the.log>:

The idea of silly putty gumming up the power port is really not a nice one. Ever try to get silly putty out of, say, fabric (once it has the chance to soak in).

Silly-putty in computer sockets -- I think ve-e-e-ry bad idea.

Well, don't insert into USB ports....

But a toothbrush seems a good idea for cleaning the Mag safe power port.

Message #15 - Posted 2013/07/25 - Doug Anderson

John McWilliams <jpmcw@comcast.net> writes:

On 7/24/13 PDT 10:24 AM, Iceman wrote:

On 22 Jul 2013 22:26:26 -0700, Doug Anderson wrote in message <news:3c4nbl7sot.fsf@ethel.the.log>:

The idea of silly putty gumming up the power port is really not a nice one. Ever try to get silly putty out of, say, fabric (once it has the chance to soak in).

Silly-putty in computer sockets -- I think ve-e-e-ry bad idea.

Well, don't insert into USB ports....

But a toothbrush seems a good idea for cleaning the Mag safe power port.

If you have little grains of iron stuck in there by magnetism from the port, a toothbrush is insufficient to dislodge them.

Message #16 - Posted 2013/07/25 - Patty Winter

Previously, John McWilliams wrote:

Well, don't insert into USB ports....

But a toothbrush seems a good idea for cleaning the Mag safe power port.

That sounds like a fine idea for dust, but would it dislodge bits of metal that are sticking to the magnet? Wouldn't it just rub them back and forth across the connector, possibly causing further problems?

Patty

Message #17 - Posted 2013/07/28 - Paul Sture

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

Patty Winter <patty1@wintertime.com> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

It was a little tricky to extract the particles once I identified the problem. I could see them - like little grains of sand, but since they were held in by the magnetism, I couldn't shake them out or anything.

Wouldn't a small magnet have done the job?

It would have to be both small enough to get into the power port of the MacBook, and more powerful than the fairly powerful magnets built in there. I own many magnets, but none that meet both criteria, though they must exist.

The laws of physics could be against you there. :-)

A small electromagnet with enough power might do the job though.

Paul Sture

Message #18 - Posted 2013/07/28 - Paul Sture

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

Don Bruder <Don@sonic.net> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

This is a terrifying suggestion, but certainly more fun than tweezers, toothpicks and shishkebab skewers which was my actual solution!

Terrifying??? OK, I'll ask... Why?

The idea of silly putty gumming up the power port is really not a nice one. Ever try to get silly putty out of, say, fabric (once it has the chance to soak in).

My mind now turns to solvents, which could also make a mess of other bits of your Mac...

Paul Sture

Message #19 - Posted 2013/07/28 - Doug Anderson

Paul Sture <nospam@sture.ch> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

Don Bruder <Don@sonic.net> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

This is a terrifying suggestion, but certainly more fun than tweezers, toothpicks and shishkebab skewers which was my actual solution!

Terrifying??? OK, I'll ask... Why?

The idea of silly putty gumming up the power port is really not a nice one. Ever try to get silly putty out of, say, fabric (once it has the chance to soak in).

My mind now turns to solvents, which could also make a mess of other bits of your Mac...

No, that doesn't solve the problem. Think of a large grain of sand but made of something like iron (that magnets attract).

I wouldn't want to be pouring a solvent in there to dissolve it.

Message #20 - Posted 2013/07/29 - Paul Sture

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

Paul Sture <nospam@sture.ch> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

Don Bruder <Don@sonic.net> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

This is a terrifying suggestion, but certainly more fun than tweezers, toothpicks and shishkebab skewers which was my actual solution!

Terrifying??? OK, I'll ask... Why?

The idea of silly putty gumming up the power port is really not a nice one. Ever try to get silly putty out of, say, fabric (once it has the chance to soak in).

My mind now turns to solvents, which could also make a mess of other bits of your Mac...

No, that doesn't solve the problem. Think of a large grain of sand but made of something like iron (that magnets attract).

I wouldn't want to be pouring a solvent in there to dissolve it.

Well, I was thinking of solvents to remove the silly putty. i.e. the cure is worse than the original problem.

There was an old lady who swallowed a fly:

<http://www.hibeamlyrics.com/there-was-an-old-lady-who-swallowed-a-fly-ly rics-raffi.html>

Paul Sture

Message #21 - Posted 2013/07/29 - Doug Anderson

Paul Sture <nospam@sture.ch> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

Paul Sture <nospam@sture.ch> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

Don Bruder <Don@sonic.net> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

This is a terrifying suggestion, but certainly more fun than tweezers, toothpicks and shishkebab skewers which was my actual solution!

Terrifying??? OK, I'll ask... Why?

The idea of silly putty gumming up the power port is really not a nice one. Ever try to get silly putty out of, say, fabric (once it has the chance to soak in).

My mind now turns to solvents, which could also make a mess of other bits of your Mac...

No, that doesn't solve the problem. Think of a large grain of sand but made of something like iron (that magnets attract).

I wouldn't want to be pouring a solvent in there to dissolve it.

Well, I was thinking of solvents to remove the silly putty. i.e. the cure is worse than the original problem.

Oh, I gotcha.

Well I'm interested in someone _else_ running this particular experiment.

Message #22 - Posted 2013/07/29 - Don Bruder

Previously, Paul Sture wrote:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

Paul Sture <nospam@sture.ch> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

Don Bruder <Don@sonic.net> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

This is a terrifying suggestion, but certainly more fun than tweezers,
toothpicks and shishkebab skewers which was my actual solution!

Terrifying??? OK, I'll ask... Why?

The idea of silly putty gumming up the power port is really not a nice one. Ever try to get silly putty out of, say, fabric (once it has the chance to soak in).

My mind now turns to solvents, which could also make a mess of other bits of your Mac...

No, that doesn't solve the problem. Think of a large grain of sand but made of something like iron (that magnets attract).

I wouldn't want to be pouring a solvent in there to dissolve it.

Well, I was thinking of solvents to remove the silly putty. i.e. the cure is worse than the original problem.

Except that done even semi-sorta-almost-kinda-close-to correctly, there's no issue with the silly-putty. You squish it on. You snap it off. You do it again a couple times. The stuck bits are gone. Problem solved, operation over. Fercrissake, people, you're starting to sound like the fuggin' EPA circling around a spilled drop of oil on the sidewalk and planning a multi-million dollar cleanup operation! Quit inventing a crisis already!

If the door is baroque don't be Haydn. Come around Bach and jiggle the Handel.

Message #23 - Posted 2013/07/29 - Doug Anderson

Don Bruder <Don@sonic.net> writes:

Previously, Paul Sture wrote:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

Paul Sture <nospam@sture.ch> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

Don Bruder <Don@sonic.net> writes:

Previously, Doug Anderson wrote:

This is a terrifying suggestion, but certainly more fun than tweezers,
toothpicks and shishkebab skewers which was my actual solution!

Terrifying??? OK, I'll ask... Why?

The idea of silly putty gumming up the power port is really not a nice one. Ever try to get silly putty out of, say, fabric (once it has the chance to soak in).

My mind now turns to solvents, which could also make a mess of other bits of your Mac...

No, that doesn't solve the problem. Think of a large grain of sand but made of something like iron (that magnets attract).

I wouldn't want to be pouring a solvent in there to dissolve it.

Well, I was thinking of solvents to remove the silly putty. i.e. the cure is worse than the original problem.

Except that done even semi-sorta-almost-kinda-close-to correctly, there's no issue with the silly-putty. You squish it on. You snap it off. You do it again a couple times. The stuck bits are gone. Problem solved, operation over. Fercrissake, people, you're starting to sound like the fuggin' EPA circling around a spilled drop of oil on the sidewalk and planning a multi-million dollar cleanup operation! Quit inventing a crisis already!

I'm waiting for someone to tell me they've _done_ this experiment rather than telling me it _should_ work.

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