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PowerMac deadness following power cut

Message #1 - Posted 2007/02/28 - macfizz@gmail.com

We had a power cut here for a couple of minutes this morning. Most of our machines are on UPS or surge suppressors, but sod's law dictated that this one PowerMac wasn't.

It doesn't boot. At all. The power light is on on the monitor (17" Cinema Display, TFT - the one with the power light and switch at bottom right).
When I touch this, the light comes on brightly and then fades again to normal brightness. Pressing the power switch on the computer makes the light come on for a second and then off again. So power is clearly getting to the computer and there is some response to trying to start.

But there is no sound of anything happening in the computer - no fan, no disk startup, nothing.

Any thoughts, anyone?

macfizz.
--

Message #2 - Posted 2007/02/28 - Jim

Previously, macfizz@gmail.com wrote:

Any thoughts, anyone?

Unplug frommains, leave for 30 mins, try again.

Probably won't work but always worth a try.

Jim

Find me at http://www.ursaMinorBeta.co.uk Please help to bring two classic works of whisky literature back into print by visiting http://www.ClassicExpressions.co.uk Thank you. "The deil's awa, the deil's awa, the deil's awa wi' th' Exciseman."

Message #3 - Posted 2007/02/28 - Jon B

Jim wrote:

Previously, macfizz@gmail.com wrote: >

Any thoughts, anyone?

Unplug frommains, leave for 30 mins, try again.

Probably won't work but always worth a try.

Powercuts have a nasty habit of flattening PRAM batteries too. Otherwise it's probably the PSU.

Jon B
Above email address IS valid.
<http://www.bramley-computers.co.uk/> Apple Laptop Repairs.

Message #4 - Posted 2007/02/28 - macfizz@gmail.com

On Feb 28, 12:01 pm, Jon B wrote:

Powercuts have a nasty habit of flattening PRAM batteries too. Otherwise it's probably the PSU.

I wondered about the PSU. But if that had gone, I should see the power light coming on on the box or the monitor, should I?

Message #5 - Posted 2007/02/28 - Jon B

macfizz@gmail.com wrote:

On Feb 28, 12:01 pm, Jon B wrote:

Powercuts have a nasty habit of flattening PRAM batteries too. Otherwise it's probably the PSU.

I wondered about the PSU. But if that had gone, I should see the power light coming on on the box or the monitor, should I?

The trickle feed might still be there to power the LED, which version PowerMac is it? Can check down the diagnostic charts, but chances are the next item on the list after PRAM & PSU is the logic board... --
Jon B
Above email address IS valid.
<http://www.bramley-computers.co.uk/> Apple Laptop Repairs.

Message #6 - Posted 2007/02/28 - Peter Ashby

macfizz@gmail.com wrote:

We had a power cut here for a couple of minutes this morning. Most of our machines are on UPS or surge suppressors, but sod's law dictated that this one PowerMac wasn't.

It doesn't boot. At all. The power light is on on the monitor (17" Cinema Display, TFT - the one with the power light and switch at bottom right).
When I touch this, the light comes on brightly and then fades again to normal brightness. Pressing the power switch on the computer makes the light come on for a second and then off again. So power is clearly getting to the computer and there is some response to trying to start.

But there is no sound of anything happening in the computer - no fan, no disk startup, nothing.

Any thoughts, anyone?

Our G3 iMac, plugged into a surge board and switched off after the cut anyway died, dead motherboard and PSU. Anyone want the carcase btw?

I attempted to get the power company to cough up but no joy.

Peter

Add my middle initial to email me. It has become attached to a country www.the-brights.net

Message #7 - Posted 2007/02/28 - macfizz@gmail.com

On Feb 28, 12:42 pm, Jon B wrote:

The trickle feed might still be there to power the LED, which version PowerMac is it? Can check down the diagnostic charts, but chances are the next item on the list after PRAM & PSU is the logic board...

It's a Power Mac G4 800MHz (Quicksilver 2002). If it's the PRAM what can I do? I tried zapping the PRAM (but you need to power up to do that...) and resetting the power manager (no obvious result). Can you replace PRAM batteries?

macfizz.
--

Message #8 - Posted 2007/02/28 - Peter Ashby

macfizz@gmail.com wrote:

On Feb 28, 12:42 pm, Jon B wrote:

The trickle feed might still be there to power the LED, which version PowerMac is it? Can check down the diagnostic charts, but chances are the next item on the list after PRAM & PSU is the logic board...

It's a Power Mac G4 800MHz (Quicksilver 2002). If it's the PRAM what can I do? I tried zapping the PRAM (but you need to power up to do that...) and resetting the power manager (no obvious result). Can you replace PRAM batteries?

Have you tried pressing the reset button on the motherboard? I had a G3 tower that apparently died at work. I visited it in the electronics workshop, the guy had run out of ideas, I reached over and pressed the reset button and hey-presto! one living Mac.

Can't remember where it is on the quicksilvers, a visit to the apple tech pages should locate it.

Peter

Add my middle initial to email me. It has become attached to a country www.the-brights.net

Message #9 - Posted 2007/02/28 - Paul Womar

Peter Ashby wrote:

macfizz@gmail.com wrote:

On Feb 28, 12:42 pm, Jon B wrote:

The trickle feed might still be there to power the LED, which version PowerMac is it? Can check down the diagnostic charts, but chances are the next item on the list after PRAM & PSU is the logic board...

It's a Power Mac G4 800MHz (Quicksilver 2002). If it's the PRAM what can I do? I tried zapping the PRAM (but you need to power up to do that...) and resetting the power manager (no obvious result). Can you replace PRAM batteries?

Have you tried pressing the reset button on the motherboard? I had a G3 tower that apparently died at work. I visited it in the electronics workshop, the guy had run out of ideas, I reached over and pressed the reset button and hey-presto! one living Mac.

Can't remember where it is on the quicksilvers, a visit to the apple tech pages should locate it.

I was just about to say just that. My old dual 1Ghz G4 Quicksilver would pretty much always do this every time I had a power cut, the button should be very near the PRAM battery which I think is a few inches from the top of the motherboard, towards the front.

-> The email address used in this message *IS* valid <-

Message #10 - Posted 2007/02/28 - macfizz@gmail.com

On Feb 28, 6:29 pm, {$Paul Womar wrote:

Have you tried pressing the reset button on the motherboard? I had a G3

I was just about to say just that. My old dual 1Ghz G4 Quicksilver would pretty much always do this every time I had a power cut, the button should be very near the PRAM battery which I think is a few inches from the top of the motherboard, towards the front.

What total stars you are - that has done the trick. I pressed that button and all deadness departed. That PowerMac is back up and running as normal. And I will be flicking through the Misco catalogue this evening in search of a new UPS.

Thanks folks,

macfizz.
--

Message #11 - Posted 2007/02/28 - Peter Ashby

macfizz@gmail.com wrote:

On Feb 28, 6:29 pm, {$Paul Womar wrote:

Have you tried pressing the reset button on the motherboard? I had a G3

I was just about to say just that. My old dual 1Ghz G4 Quicksilver would pretty much always do this every time I had a power cut, the button should be very near the PRAM battery which I think is a few inches from the top of the motherboard, towards the front.

What total stars you are - that has done the trick. I pressed that button and all deadness departed. That PowerMac is back up and running as normal. And I will be flicking through the Misco catalogue this evening in search of a new UPS.

Thanks folks,

macfizz.
--

Wonderful news, very glad to have been of service. That is the wonder of usenet, almost always someone who has been there before you.

Peter

Add my middle initial to email me. It has become attached to a country www.the-brights.net

Message #12 - Posted 2007/02/28 - D.M. Procida

macfizz@gmail.com wrote:

On Feb 28, 6:29 pm, {$Paul Womar wrote:

Have you tried pressing the reset button on the motherboard? I had a G3

I was just about to say just that. My old dual 1Ghz G4 Quicksilver would pretty much always do this every time I had a power cut, the button should be very near the PRAM battery which I think is a few inches from the top of the motherboard, towards the front.

What total stars you are - that has done the trick. I pressed that button and all deadness departed. That PowerMac is back up and running as normal. And I will be flicking through the Misco catalogue this evening in search of a new UPS.

Is that really worth it? All G4s are prone to this weird going dead thing after a power cut; it takes a second to press the button and have it spring back into life.

Daniele

Message #13 - Posted 2007/02/28 - macfizz@gmail.com

On Feb 28, 9:38 pm, D.M. Procida wrote:

Is that really worth it? All G4s are prone to this weird going dead thing after a power cut; it takes a second to press the button and have it spring back into life.

Daniele

Fair enough, if that is the extent of the damage, but I think I had a lucky escape this time. I got away without any data loss or disk crashes for one thing. That power outage could have happened while I was doing something disk-intensive and although I have daily backups I might have had the hassle of replacing a disk (I have 3 disks totalling 600 GB of space on that born-again PowerMac). Anyway, you can get a reasonable UPS for =A340 nowadays, and that'll give surge protection and enough battery power to do a graceful shutdown.

macfizz.
--

Message #14 - Posted 2007/02/28 - Jaimie Vandenbergh

On Wed, 28 Feb 2007 21:38:52 +0000, D.M. Procida wrote:

macfizz@gmail.com wrote:

On Feb 28, 6:29 pm, {$Paul Womar wrote:

Have you tried pressing the reset button on the motherboard? I had a G3

I was just about to say just that. My old dual 1Ghz G4 Quicksilver would pretty much always do this every time I had a power cut, the button should be very near the PRAM battery which I think is a few inches from the top of the motherboard, towards the front.

What total stars you are - that has done the trick. I pressed that button and all deadness departed. That PowerMac is back up and running as normal. And I will be flicking through the Misco catalogue this evening in search of a new UPS.

Is that really worth it? All G4s are prone to this weird going dead thing after a power cut; it takes a second to press the button and have it spring back into life.

Not very useful when you've lost whatever you were working on, and possibly had a power spike cause trouble in your PSU.

Yes, they're worth it. But not just to avoid opening the case and pressing a button.

Cheers - Jaimie

If it wasn't for C, we'd all be using BASI, PASAL and OBOL

Message #15 - Posted 2007/03/01 - Jon B

macfizz@gmail.com wrote:

On Feb 28, 12:42 pm, Jon B wrote:

The trickle feed might still be there to power the LED, which version PowerMac is it? Can check down the diagnostic charts, but chances are the next item on the list after PRAM & PSU is the logic board...

It's a Power Mac G4 800MHz (Quicksilver 2002). If it's the PRAM what can I do? I tried zapping the PRAM (but you need to power up to do that...) and resetting the power manager (no obvious result). Can you replace PRAM batteries?

Yep, drop the side panel, and you'll see a half AA lithium battery on the board. Try dropping it out, some machines won't start with a flat PRAM battery but if you simply remove/disconnect it it will then start. --
Jon B
Above email address IS valid.
<http://www.bramley-computers.co.uk/> Apple Laptop Repairs.

Message #16 - Posted 2007/03/01 - Roger Merriman

D.M. Procida wrote:

macfizz@gmail.com wrote:

On Feb 28, 6:29 pm, {$Paul Womar wrote:

Have you tried pressing the reset button on the motherboard? I had a G3

I was just about to say just that. My old dual 1Ghz G4 Quicksilver would pretty much always do this every time I had a power cut, the button should be very near the PRAM battery which I think is a few inches from the top of the motherboard, towards the front.

What total stars you are - that has done the trick. I pressed that button and all deadness departed. That PowerMac is back up and running as normal. And I will be flicking through the Misco catalogue this evening in search of a new UPS.

Is that really worth it? All G4s are prone to this weird going dead thing after a power cut; it takes a second to press the button and have it spring back into life.

Daniele

i have a old quicksilver that needs resetting every now and then, it is a funny old beast, as it will not shut down.... and if you've pulled the plug it may not start when you want... hence me getting it at a knock down price!

roger

Message #17 - Posted 2007/03/02 - macfuck

Previously "macfizz@gmail.com wrote:

We had a power cut here for a couple of minutes this morning. Most of our machines are on UPS or surge suppressors, but sod's law dictated that this one PowerMac wasn't.

It doesn't boot. At all. The power light is on on the monitor (17" Cinema Display, TFT - the one with the power light and switch at bottom right).
When I touch this, the light comes on brightly and then fades again to normal brightness. Pressing the power switch on the computer makes the light come on for a second and then off again. So power is clearly getting to the computer and there is some response to trying to start.

But there is no sound of anything happening in the computer - no fan, no disk startup, nothing.

Any thoughts, anyone?

Yes, Apple does a shitty job providing surge protection. This is not the first time.

macfizz.
--

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