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sleep = hibernate?

Message #1 - Posted 2005/05/22 - Markus Dehmann

On my windows system I am used to hibernate my computer, i.e. suspend to disk. That means it is really turned off, but it will read the current state from the disk (or RAM) next time and everything continues seemlessly.

My powerbook does not have "hibernate". Is putting it to sleep more or less the same? Does it still consume energy in sleep mode? If yes, is there a method that's more like hibernate (i.e. really turns the computer off, but will continue at the same point after new start)?

Thanks!
Markus

Message #2 - Posted 2005/05/21 - Kevin McMurtrie

Previously, Markus Dehmann wrote:

On my windows system I am used to hibernate my computer, i.e. suspend to disk. That means it is really turned off, but it will read the current state from the disk (or RAM) next time and everything continues seemlessly.

My powerbook does not have "hibernate". Is putting it to sleep more or less the same? Does it still consume energy in sleep mode? If yes, is there a method that's more like hibernate (i.e. really turns the computer off, but will continue at the same point after new start)?

Thanks!
Markus

Different Macs sleep in different ways. Some lower the clock rates to a minimum, which drops consumption to nearly nothing CMOS devices. Some also turn off power to parts of the hardware. For desktops, generally the motherboard hardware remains powered but operating at minimum speed while small peripheral devices go into whatever their power saving mode is. Laptops will be more aggressive about cutting power entirely. Some older Macs will sleep very differently in OS 9 versus OS X.

Apple's support area should show the sleep power consumption for your model. A Powerbook's sleep mode probably draws something in the area of 1/2 to 1/4 watt.

Message #3 - Posted 2005/05/22 - Jerry Kindall

Previously, Markus Dehmann wrote:

On my windows system I am used to hibernate my computer, i.e. suspend to disk. That means it is really turned off, but it will read the current state from the disk (or RAM) next time and everything continues seemlessly.

My powerbook does not have "hibernate". Is putting it to sleep more or less the same?

No, it's more like putting a PC laptop to sleep.

Does it still consume energy in sleep mode?

Yes, some -- the exact amount will vary by model.

If yes, is
there a method that's more like hibernate (i.e. really turns the computer off, but will continue at the same point after new start)?

Not really, unfortunately. They had this feature on the "classic" Mac OS once upon a time, but they disabled it because it was corrupting people's disks, and it hasn't been back.

Jerry Kindall, Seattle, WA <http://www.jerrykindall.com/>

Send only plain text messages under 32K to the Reply-To address. This mailbox is filtered aggressively to thwart spam and viruses.

Message #4 - Posted 2005/05/22 - Ron Parsons

Previously, Markus Dehmann wrote:

On my windows system I am used to hibernate my computer, i.e. suspend to disk. That means it is really turned off, but it will read the current state from the disk (or RAM) next time and everything continues seemlessly.

My powerbook does not have "hibernate". Is putting it to sleep more or less the same? Does it still consume energy in sleep mode? If yes, is there a method that's more like hibernate (i.e. really turns the computer off, but will continue at the same point after new start)?

My G3 PowerBook (Pismo) uses so little energy while sleeping that it would be weeks before you would see any change in the battery life indications when you wake it up.

Unlike the hibernate and sleep modes you saw before, it wakes so fast that it is ready to go by the time I move my hand from opening the lid to the keyboard. And also unlike the things I've read about other hardware, it never hangs.

It does however check to see if you have connected anything. It will notice any change to your network connection or video out. It is so slick about it, that the normal thing to do when switching to a new network, connecting a new display or projector is to simply close the lid, connect or disconnect and open the lid.

Speaking of projectors, it seems to remember a projector it has used before and switches resolutions to what you last used with it and when that projector is no longer there, switch back.

I'm told it will remember a background image the same way.

So, back to your original questions, I never shut down, only sleep and typically see 6+ hours of battery life.

Message #5 - Posted 2005/05/22 - Mathue

Previously, Markus Dehmann wrote:

On my windows system I am used to hibernate my computer, i.e. suspend to disk. That means it is really turned off, but it will read the current state from the disk (or RAM) next time and everything continues seemlessly.

My powerbook does not have "hibernate". Is putting it to sleep more or less the same? Does it still consume energy in sleep mode? If yes, is there a method that's more like hibernate (i.e. really turns the computer off, but will continue at the same point after new start)?

Sleep is similar from a user function point of view. It still draws current while asleep and allows much faster wake-up.

If there is a way to do the equivalent to hibernating on OS X I've not seen it.

MT - Diagonally parked in a parallel universe.

101010

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