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Time Capsule Noisy Fans?

Message #1 - Posted 2008/03/29 - Mark Conrad

Seems like most of the reports at this site suggest the excessive fan noise might be some sort of problem.

<http://discussions.apple.com/message.jspa?messageID=6802289>

Think it might be wise to delay _my_ purchase until
most other people are happy with _their_ TC purchases!

Mark-

--
Darn, and my "Bush" $300 kickback was aimed at TC

Message #2 - Posted 2008/03/29 - Michelle Steiner

Previously, Mark Conrad wrote:

Think it might be wise to delay _my_ purchase until most other people are happy with _their_ TC purchases!

Then you'll never get one because you'll never know whether most other people are happy with their TC purchases. People who are happy with their purchases rarely post about it, and when they do, it's usually in response to those who are complaining; the people who post are usually those who complain.

That being said, I bought a TC on Feb 29th, and am very happy with it. I had a lot of difficulty setting a WDS network with the TC and an Airport Express, but that's because the included documentation was incomplete. The document about setting up a WDS network is on Apple's web site; without it, it's durn nigh impossible. (Of course, this applies to any WDS network using Airport, whether the equipment includes a TC, Airport Extreme, or Airport Express.) But that's not a problem with the hardware itself.

Support the troops: Bring them home ASAP.

Message #3 - Posted 2008/03/29 - Bob Harris

Previously, Mark Conrad wrote:

Seems like most of the reports at this site suggest the excessive fan noise might be some sort of problem.

<http://discussions.apple.com/message.jspa?messageID=6802289>

Think it might be wise to delay _my_ purchase until
most other people are happy with _their_ TC purchases!

Mark-

--
Darn, and my "Bush" $300 kickback was aimed at TC

Now that the Airport Extreme 802.11n base station supports Time Machine for externally added disks, you can get any quiet external disk you want, plug it into the Airport Extreme, and get the best of both worlds.

Plus you can get a terabyte of storage and an Airport Extreme 802.11n base station for a lot less than the 1TB Time Capsule. The 500GB Time Capsule is closer to the cost of an external 500GB drive and an Airport Extreme 802.11n base station.

Just a thought.

Bob Harris

Message #4 - Posted 2008/03/29 - Mark Conrad

Previously, Michelle Steiner wrote:

That being said, I bought a TC on Feb 29th, and am very happy with it. I had a lot of difficulty setting a WDS network with the TC and an Airport Express, but that's because the included documentation was incomplete. The document about setting up a WDS network is on Apple's web site; without it, it's durn nigh impossible.

Just curious, do you really benefit from something as sophisticated as WDS? Seems like overkill to me, unless one has a bunch of Airport networks in their home.

Umm, one other question.

Is there any benefit in TC so far as having both the Airport Express 802.11n base-station _and_ the hard drive in one chassis?

(other than the obvious benefit of fewer chassis lying around)

If so, I might take my chances and buy TC, the one TB model.

Mark-

Message #5 - Posted 2008/03/29 - Mark Conrad

Previously, Bob Harris wrote:

Now that the Airport Extreme 802.11n base station supports Time Machine for externally added disks, you can get any quiet external disk you want, plug it into the Airport Extreme, and get the best of both worlds.

Yeah, that might be the preferred way to buy, for nervous types like me.

According to that website, Apple _is_ allowing users to exchange the noisy units, no questions asked.

Kinda wonder where all those noisy units are winding up.<g>

Perhaps Apple sends them back to the drive manufacturer?

Mark-

Message #6 - Posted 2008/03/29 - Michelle Steiner

Previously, Mark Conrad wrote:

Just curious, do you really benefit from something as sophisticated as WDS? Seems like overkill to me, unless one has a bunch of Airport networks in their home.

The Time Capsule is connected to the computer. The Airport Express is connected to the DirecTV DVR.

DirecTV's video on demand is over the internet, not via satellite like its normal programming. I needed a way to connect the DVR to the cable modem, and because of the layout of the house, wireless was the way to go. Hence, the WDS.

Is there any benefit in TC so far as having both the Airport Express 802.11n base-station _and_ the hard drive in one chassis?

(other than the obvious benefit of fewer chassis lying around)

Now that Apple has upgraded the firmware for the Airport Extreme and upgraded the Airport software for the computer, that's the only benefit that I can see. When I bought the TC, it was not possible to run Time Machine on a hard disk attached to an Airport Extreme.

By the way, before buying the Time Capsule, I attempted to use three different brands of wireless bridges to connect the DVR to my wireless router, and none of them worked. If I had got one of them to work, I would have kept that router and bought a FireWire drive to use for Time Machine. But one benefit I got from doing it this way was that by upgrading the router, I got 802.11n, which the previous router was not capable of. (As mentioned in a previous message, I originally got the original Airport Express, which was an 802.11b/g router, but was able to return it and replace it with the 802.11n model.)

Support the troops: Bring them home ASAP.

Message #7 - Posted 2008/03/30 - Mark Conrad

Previously, Michelle Steiner wrote:

Just curious, do you really benefit from something as sophisticated as WDS? Seems like overkill to me, unless one has a bunch of Airport networks in their home.

The Time Capsule is connected to the computer. The Airport Express is connected to the DirecTV DVR.

DirecTV's video on demand is over the internet, not via satellite like its normal programming. I needed a way to connect the DVR to the cable modem, and because of the layout of the house, wireless was the way to go. Hence, the WDS.

Gotcha. You must be some sort of network wizard by now.<g>

All that WDS network configuration stuff is w-a-y beyond my feeble comprehension, fortunately I can live without it for now.

All my meager network problems are handled by Timbuktu software, plus some "PowerKey 4.3.1" hardware & software. (from Sophisticated Circuits)

...plus a small herd of special hardware relays
that I wired up myself...

Oh yeah, plus a hack & slash modification I made to
my Mac Mini Duo.

Egad, appears we _all_ do things the hard way, when it comes to remote networking.

A-n-y-h-o-w, the net upshot of all my flailing around is that I can easily _remotely_ operate all my six Macs with their Windows partitions (XP and Vista) ...and
even with my one PC ...and my various printers.

...plus shut them all down to a dead cold AC power-off condition when they are not being used.

Don't let anyone kid you though, there are still a few things that can not be done remotely - - - things that require one to be sitting at their computer to do.

"Throwing" your voice 2,000 miles from one Mac to another is very difficult, even if you have a very loud voice.

uh, listening to any great words our remote Mac is speaking is yet another problem, seems the audio technology in general has not kept up with the other stuff.

No real reason for this, seems _someone_ should be able to design hardware/software so that we could all hear any great thoughts our remote Macs are vocalizing.

Will come in handy centuries from now when our computers become more intelligent than we are. hee-hee

I can imagine it now, a Mac with a Ph.D degree teaching students at some of our universities.

Mark-

--
Complete post from Michelle Steiner:

Previously, Mark Conrad wrote:

Just curious, do you really benefit from something as sophisticated as WDS? Seems like overkill to me, unless one has a bunch of Airport networks in their home.

The Time Capsule is connected to the computer. The Airport Express is connected to the DirecTV DVR.

DirecTV's video on demand is over the internet, not via satellite like its normal programming. I needed a way to connect the DVR to the cable modem, and because of the layout of the house, wireless was the way to go. Hence, the WDS.

Is there any benefit in TC so far as having both the Airport Express 802.11n base-station _and_ the hard drive in one chassis?

(other than the obvious benefit of fewer chassis lying around)

Now that Apple has upgraded the firmware for the Airport Extreme and upgraded the Airport software for the computer, that's the only benefit that I can see. When I bought the TC, it was not possible to run Time Machine on a hard disk attached to an Airport Extreme.

By the way, before buying the Time Capsule, I attempted to use three different brands of wireless bridges to connect the DVR to my wireless router, and none of them worked. If I had got one of them to work, I would have kept that router and bought a FireWire drive to use for Time Machine. But one benefit I got from doing it this way was that by upgrading the router, I got 802.11n, which the previous router was not capable of. (As mentioned in a previous message, I originally got the original Airport Express, which was an 802.11b/g router, but was able to return it and replace it with the 802.11n model.)

--
Support the troops: Bring them home ASAP.

Message #8 - Posted 2008/03/30 - Robert Haar

On 3/29/08 9:38 PMMar 29, Michelle Steiner wrote:

Previously, Mark Conrad wrote:

Just curious, do you really benefit from something as sophisticated as WDS? Seems like overkill to me, unless one has a bunch of Airport networks in their home.

The Time Capsule is connected to the computer. The Airport Express is connected to the DirecTV DVR.

My home network is similar but with a few twists. I have not found it necessary to run WDS - yet.

I have cable modem to firewall to Gigabit Ethernet router. On that LAN, I have two Power Macs, and Airport Extreme, a 1 TB NAS and a networked laser printer. I put a LaCie MiniHub on the Airport Extreme that I am now using for Time Machine.

I use the Airport network for connecting my work laptop (Windows unfortunately), a PS3 and visiting family members with laptops.

To this mix, I added an Airport Express for streaming audio to my stereo system.

If Apple TV supported DVR functionality, I would add one to my HD TV home theater set up. In particular, I'd like to sue it to record HD cable content without having a Mac act as an recording middle man.

DirecTV's video on demand is over the internet, not via satellite like its normal programming. I needed a way to connect the DVR to the cable modem, and because of the layout of the house, wireless was the way to go. Hence, the WDS.

Is there any benefit in TC so far as having both the Airport Express 802.11n base-station _and_ the hard drive in one chassis?

(other than the obvious benefit of fewer chassis lying around)

Now that Apple has upgraded the firmware for the Airport Extreme and upgraded the Airport software for the computer, that's the only benefit that I can see. When I bought the TC, it was not possible to run Time Machine on a hard disk attached to an Airport Extreme.

The LaCie Mini Hub makes a tidy companion to the Airport Extreme. I like having the option of updating either one independently.

Message #9 - Posted 2008/03/30 - Michelle Steiner

Previously, Robert Haar wrote:

The Time Capsule is connected to the computer. The Airport Express is connected to the DirecTV DVR.

My home network is similar but with a few twists. I have not found it necessary to run WDS - yet.

The only way I found to get the Airport Express to work with the DVR was to use WDS. The AE is connected to the DVR via ethernet, and the DVR has an IP address in the LAN.

Support the troops: Bring them home ASAP.

Message #10 - Posted 2008/03/30 - Michelle Steiner

Previously, Mark Conrad wrote:

DirecTV's video on demand is over the internet, not via satellite like its normal programming. I needed a way to connect the DVR to the cable modem, and because of the layout of the house, wireless was the way to go. Hence, the WDS.

Gotcha. You must be some sort of network wizard by now.<g>

Not really. It took two hours on the phone with Apple tech support to figure it out. The key is that I had to enter the MAC address (or, as Apple calls it, the Airport ID) of each device into the setup for the other.

But I might be an expert on how to set up a WDS with Airport hardware. Hint: make sure that when you enter the MAC addresses, you don't make any typographical errors.

Support the troops: Bring them home ASAP.

Message #11 - Posted 2008/03/30 - Mark Conrad

Previously, Robert Haar <rlhaar@comcast.net> wrote: (to Michelle Steiner)

Michelle:

The Time Capsule is connected to the computer. The Airport Express is connected to the DirecTV DVR.

Robert:

My home network is similar but with a few twists. I have not found it necessary to run WDS - yet.

I have cable modem to firewall to Gigabit Ethernet router.

I have a few twists on your twists.<g>

I would _love_ to have a cable modem here, however the local phone company and I have a war going.

Long story, they will not fix their local automatic relays about two blocks away from my rural ranch, even my voice phone is often 'scratchy' because of those relays.

So I remain on slow dialup, instead of subscribing to cable.

I use Airport inside my home for connecting to my six
other Macs and one PC, a custom ASUS...

...also for connecting to "visiting firemen", mainly local tradesmen and friends, who often park off-road about 200 feet from my house in a area I cleared for them beside the rural gravel road that passes my ranch.

The Airport signal from my base station reaches there strong enough to allow us to shoot the breeze whenever they decide it is not worth the trouble to wait for me to round up
my dogs, to allow them to visit my ranch house.

(EVERYONE up here has big vicious dogs,
they replace the non-existent law enforcement)

...and visiting family members with laptops.

I solve that by throwing a "free copy" of Windows Timbuktu into their laptops.

Apparently Netopia does not care enough about
Windows Timbuktu to even require Windows users to "activate" their Windows copy of TB2 - - - whereas Mac users are _definitely_ required to activate. Go figure.

I get around whatever Netopia has in their EULA by insisting that my family members allow me to remove TB2 from their laptops before they leave.

Most of my family members bought TB2 on their own, however it seems that other remote app's are more popular among PC users.

The LaCie Mini Hub makes a tidy companion
to the Airport Extreme.

Yep, I have two Minis, older Mini is headless; I use it to try out app's that I might want to install permanently into my other Macs.

Mark-

Message #12 - Posted 2008/03/30 - Michelle Steiner

Previously, Mark Conrad wrote:

I have a few twists on your twists.<g>

I would _love_ to have a cable modem here, however the local phone company and I have a war going.

Long story, they will not fix their local automatic relays about two blocks away from my rural ranch, even my voice phone is often 'scratchy' because of those relays.

So I remain on slow dialup, instead of subscribing to cable.

Does your cable company provide your telephone service?

Support the troops: Bring them home ASAP.

Message #13 - Posted 2008/03/30 - Mike Rosenberg

Mark Conrad wrote:

I would _love_ to have a cable modem here, however the local phone company and I have a war going.

Cable modems go with cable internet, which is provided by cable TV companies. Do you mean your phone company is also a cable TV provider, or do you really mean a DSL modem?

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Message #14 - Posted 2008/03/30 - Michelle Steiner

Previously, Mike Rosenberg wrote:

I would _love_ to have a cable modem here, however the local phone company and I have a war going.

Cable modems go with cable internet, which is provided by cable TV companies. Do you mean your phone company is also a cable TV provider, or do you really mean a DSL modem?

I essentially asked him the same question.

BTW, my cable provider is also my telephone provider. So I have my cable broadband and my landline telephone from the same company. But I don't have cable TV from them; I have satellite TV instead.

Support the troops: Bring them home ASAP.

Message #15 - Posted 2008/03/31 - Mark Conrad

Previously, Mike Rosenberg wrote:

Mark Conrad wrote:

I would _love_ to have a cable modem here, however the local phone company and I have a war going.

Cable modems go with cable internet, which is provided by cable TV companies. Do you mean your phone company is also a cable TV provider, or do you really mean a DSL modem?

Mike, (and Michelle) -

Do not know, I am not familiar with _either_ DSL or cable modems.

I assume DSL goes over regular phone lines, and cable has their own "cables" that they have to install.

In that case, because I see no overhead cables in this rural area, I have to assume that there is no cable service to this area.

No public advertisements for cable here, but plenty of public advertisements for DSL.

...that does not stop me from wanting cable, though.<g>

All I know for certain is that my underground phone lines go to a small automatic switching panel about 3 city blocks from here.

About every six months or so, the phone service "goes out" around here. Phone company guys work on that above-ground panel, and phone service is restored in a few hours.

After one such episode, I had _great_ phone service, my Macs could connect the first time, every time!

That lasted for about a week, then the relay contacts in the new relay oxidized, and I was back to my usual noisy connection again, often needing as many as 4 tries before my any of my Macs would connect.

Darn low-budget rural phone company has never heard of platinum contacts on "good" relays.

I refuse to buy their DSL service, because that would have to go through the same rotten relay.

Guess I am lucky to have any phone service at all, considering my rural location.

Too mountainous here for satellite service. :(

Mark-

Message #16 - Posted 2008/03/31 - Jolly Roger

Previously, Mark Conrad wrote:

Previously, Mike Rosenberg wrote:

Mark Conrad wrote:

I would _love_ to have a cable modem here, however the local phone company and I have a war going.

Cable modems go with cable internet, which is provided by cable TV companies. Do you mean your phone company is also a cable TV provider, or do you really mean a DSL modem?

Do not know, I am not familiar with _either_ DSL or cable modems.

I assume DSL goes over regular phone lines, and cable has their own "cables" that they have to install.

Cable modems use the same coaxial cable you use for cable television.

In that case, because I see no overhead cables in this rural area, I have to assume that there is no cable service to this area.

Cables can be buried underground.

Note: Please send all responses to the relevant news group. E-mail sent to this address may be devoured by my very hungry SPAM filter.

JR

Message #17 - Posted 2008/03/31 - Michelle Steiner

Previously, Mark Conrad wrote:

Cable modems go with cable internet, which is provided by cable TV companies. Do you mean your phone company is also a cable TV provider, or do you really mean a DSL modem?

Mike, (and Michelle) -

Do not know, I am not familiar with _either_ DSL or cable modems.

I assume DSL goes over regular phone lines, and cable has their own "cables" that they have to install.

Yes, DSL goes over regular phone (AKA: POTS, Plain Old Telephone Service) lines. And Cable goes over cable TV lines.

Support the troops: Bring them home ASAP.

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