The conversation on this page has been archived and is no longer active.

"Wake for Ethernet Network Administrator Access"? (how to use)

Message #1 - Posted 2006/11/08 - Mark Conrad

"Wake for Ethernet Network Administrator Access"

Set by a box in the Energy Control preferences.
(options tab)

Anyone know how to get this to work?

I tried it with an Ethernet Timbuktu network, but no success.

Two Macs connected via Ethernet cable, everything works okay as long as both Macs stayed awake.

Put one Mac to sleep, then can't rouse it from sleep from the other Mac, no matter what I do.

It is necessary to send a "Wake on LAN" packet somehow, but can't find out how to do that, despite searching Google.

Mark-

Message #2 - Posted 2006/11/08 - Jolly Roger

On 2006-11-08 07:20:41 -0600, Mark Conrad said:

"Wake for Ethernet Network Administrator Access"

Set by a box in the Energy Control preferences.
(options tab)

Anyone know how to get this to work?

I tried it with an Ethernet Timbuktu network, but no success.

Two Macs connected via Ethernet cable, everything works okay as long as both Macs stayed awake.

Put one Mac to sleep, then can't rouse it from sleep from the other Mac, no matter what I do.

It is necessary to send a "Wake on LAN" packet somehow, but can't find out how to do that, despite searching Google.

Mark-

It's fairly well explained here:

<LAN">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wake-on-LAN>

If you don't want to write your own script or program to do it, simply download WakeOnLAN from MacUpdate.com to do it for you:

<http://macupdate.com/info.php/id/15779>

Note: Wake on LAN requires an Ethernet card that supports this feature. AFAIK, *all* currently-shipping Macs (and lots of older ones) have Ethernet cards that support Wake On LAN.

Note2: For obvious reasons, Airport wireless cards do *not* support Wake on LAN.

JR

Message #3 - Posted 2006/11/08 - Clever Monkey

Mark Conrad wrote:

"Wake for Ethernet Network Administrator Access"

Set by a box in the Energy Control preferences.
(options tab)

Anyone know how to get this to work?

Find a utility or script (I have a Perl script) that knows how to send "magic" packets to MAC addresses. I think there is even something on versiontracker if you search for "wake on LAN".

Message #4 - Posted 2006/11/08 - Mark Conrad

Jolly Roger wrote:

It is necessary to send a "Wake on LAN" packet somehow, but can't find out how to do that, despite searching Google.

Mark-

It's fairly well explained here:

<LAN">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wake-on-LAN>

If you don't want to write your own script or program to do it, simply download WakeOnLAN from MacUpdate.com to do it for you:

<http://macupdate.com/info.php/id/15779>

Note: Wake on LAN requires an Ethernet card that supports this feature. AFAIK, *all* currently-shipping Macs (and lots of older ones) have Ethernet cards that support Wake On LAN.

Note2: For obvious reasons, Airport wireless cards do *not* support Wake on LAN.

Thanks, I will take the easy way out and download the script from MacUpdate.com

I already have another more flexible way to wake up my Macs:

Namely, "PowerKey 650" from Sophisticated Circuits, but it is always nice to have another alternative way, just in case the PowerKey device breaks down.

A PowerKey malfunction would be downright inconvenient, because at times I am 8,000 miles away from my home Macs.

Mark-

--
OT somewhat:

One strange thing about this old Pismo powerbook. It is hooked up via a UPS, so I thought it was 100% immune to a brief power outage, especially being it is a powerbook with its own battery.

Apparently not so. At about 4am one fine morning, my rural power company did its usual thing, a brief interruption of power while they switched generators, which made my house lights "blink".

Even my electric clock was not phased, but the Pismo's screen went black!!! Apparently it went into sleep mode, because when I hit a key the screen came right back on again.

...and yes, I have several surge protectors in my AC lines.

Very puzzling, because I can't duplicate the problem by pulling the plug on the Pismo, or by pulling the AC plug on the UPS.

Had to be some sort of surge problem that my two inline surge protectors just could not cope with.

Message #5 - Posted 2006/11/10 - David Empson

Jolly Roger wrote:

If you don't want to write your own script or program to do it, simply download WakeOnLAN from MacUpdate.com to do it for you:

<http://macupdate.com/info.php/id/15779>

Note: Wake on LAN requires an Ethernet card that supports this feature. AFAIK, *all* currently-shipping Macs (and lots of older ones) have Ethernet cards that support Wake On LAN.

Note2: For obvious reasons, Airport wireless cards do *not* support Wake on LAN.

It is worth noting that you can _send_ a magic packet via Airport to wake up a machine which is connected to the same LAN via Ethernet (e.g. through an Airport base station). I often do this using WakeOnLAN to wake up my PowerMac G4 (on Ethernet) from my PowerBook G4 (on Airport) while sitting on the couch in the next room.

You can't remotely wake up a computer which is using Airport to connect to the network.

David Empson
dempson@actrix.gen.nz

Message #6 - Posted 2006/11/09 - Jolly Roger

On 2006-11-09 05:28:02 -0600, David Empson said:

It is worth noting that you can _send_ a magic packet via Airport to wake up a machine which is connected to the same LAN via Ethernet (e.g. through an Airport base station). I often do this using WakeOnLAN to wake up my PowerMac G4 (on Ethernet) from my PowerBook G4 (on Airport) while sitting on the couch in the next room.

You can't remotely wake up a computer which is using Airport to connect to the network.

Yeah, that's a good distinction to make. Thanks.

JR

Need Help? Have a Question?

Looking for more help, comments, and answers?

Ask your questions on Ask Different. Ask Different is a community of Apple users ready to help.