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Waking up a powerbook with a mouse click

Message #1 - Posted 2005/03/05 - Z

I have a G3 powerbook (400 MHz; Pismo, I think) running OS 10.3.7. When put to sleep, it wakes up in response to keyboard activity, but not to mouse activity (either moving or clicking); that seems to be an intentional feature. It doesn't matter if I use an external mouse or the touchpad.

However, I woud like to be able to wake it up in response to clicking an external USB mouse (the reason is complicated, but suffice it to say this is not a normal use for this computer). My question is: is that something that can be controlled in software, ideally through changing a config file somewhere?

Thanks in advance, Z

Message #2 - Posted 2005/03/05 - matt neuburg

Z wrote:

I have a G3 powerbook (400 MHz; Pismo, I think) running OS 10.3.7. When put to sleep, it wakes up in response to keyboard activity, but not to mouse activity (either moving or clicking); that seems to be an intentional feature. It doesn't matter if I use an external mouse or the touchpad.

However, I woud like to be able to wake it up in response to clicking an external USB mouse (the reason is complicated, but suffice it to say this is not a normal use for this computer)

It will probably wake up in response to plugging in the mouse (or to unplugging it and plugging it back in). m.

matt neuburg, phd = matt@tidbits.com, http://www.tidbits.com/matt/ AppleScript: The Definitive Guide
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0596005571/somethingsbymatt Read TidBITS! It's free and smart. http://www.tidbits.com

Message #3 - Posted 2005/03/13 - Pete Verdon

Z wrote:

I have a G3 powerbook (400 MHz; Pismo, I think) running OS 10.3.7. When put to sleep, it wakes up in response to keyboard activity, but not to mouse activity

However, I woud like to be able to wake it up in response to clicking an external USB mouse (the reason is complicated, but suffice it to say this is not a normal use for this computer). My question is: is that something that can be controlled in software,

I don't think so. For what it's worth, my AlBook wakes to mouse clicks but not mouse movement (makes sense - it's too easy to move the mouse). The way you talk about "not a normal use" makes me wonder about other solutions, though. If you could explain what you're trying to do we may be able to help further, but here are my initial thoughts:

There are four ways I know of to wake a machine. We need to "hijack" one of them.

1. Wake-on-lan. Too complex to be improvised, but if there is another machine involved (on the same lan or over the internet) it could send a magic packet to wake your Pismo up.

2. Wake-on-ring. You'd want to read up on telephony a little before trying this, but a ring signal is basically just a (fairly high-voltage) pulse on the line. You could assemble something that would send such a voltage into the laptop modem and wake it up.

3. Keypresses. Could whatever was going to click your mouse button press a key instead? Either through some kind of mechanical linkage or through a switch that energises a solenoid and presses a key.

4. USB device insertion. My Powerbook wakes up when you plug or unplug a USB device. You could get a cheap USB mouse (or similar) and fit a switch in-line with the cable. I don't know what actually triggers a "connect" - a four-pole, four-throw switch would definitely work (electrically identical to plugging or unplugging) but you may be able to use less.

Let us know what you're actually trying to do, but these may get you on the right track.

Pete

Message #4 - Posted 2005/03/13 - Reinder Verlinde

Previously, Pete Verdon wrote:

You could get a cheap USB mouse (or similar) and fit a switch in-line with the cable. I don't know what actually triggers a "connect" - a four-pole, four-throw switch would definitely work (electrically identical to plugging or unplugging) but you may be able to use less.

That four-pole switch would have to be carefully constructed to us a safe order of closing the contacts. If you look at an USB cable, you will see that the outer (easily visible) metal contacts 'the other side' earlier than the four inner pieces of metal. This is with good reason (I believe that construction assures that the two devices have a shared earth before making electrical contact)

Reinder

Message #5 - Posted 2005/03/16 - Matthew Russotto

Previously, Reinder Verlinde wrote:

That four-pole switch would have to be carefully constructed to us a safe order of closing the contacts. If you look at an USB cable, you will see that the outer (easily visible) metal contacts 'the other side' earlier than the four inner pieces of metal. This is with good reason (I believe that construction assures that the two devices have a shared earth before making electrical contact)

You can simply leave the ground connected at all times. Not that it's going to matter a whit when connecting an unpowered plastic USB mouse. --
There's no such thing as a free lunch, but certain accounting practices can result in a fully-depreciated one.

Message #6 - Posted 2005/03/16 - Neill Massello

Z wrote:

I have a G3 powerbook (400 MHz; Pismo, I think) running OS 10.3.7. When put to sleep, it wakes up in response to keyboard activity, but not to mouse activity (either moving or clicking); that seems to be an intentional feature. It doesn't matter if I use an external mouse or the touchpad.

However, I woud like to be able to wake it up in response to clicking an external USB mouse (the reason is complicated, but suffice it to say this is not a normal use for this computer). My question is: is that something that can be controlled in software, ideally through changing a config file somewhere?

Unlikely, because waking is a function of the PMU (power management unit) that obeys its own firmware and the settings in its non-volatile RAM (NVRAM) while all processing by the CPU is halted. The available NVRAM settings vary somewhat by Mac model. I don't know what they are on a Pismo, but I doubt that you can change anything relating to its response to USB signals while asleep.

Macs are designed to wake in response to a RESUME signal from a USB device -- although in my experience just about any disturbance, including a static discharge near a USB cable, seems to have the same effect. Apparently, keyboards send this signal on a key press but mice don't on a click.

Message #7 - Posted 2005/03/21 - Steven Fisher

Previously, Z wrote:

However, I woud like to be able to wake it up in response to clicking an external USB mouse (the reason is complicated, but suffice it to say this is not a normal use for this computer). My question is: is that something that can be controlled in software, ideally through changing a config file somewhere?

At the risk of stating the obvious, have you tried a different mouse?

Steven Fisher; sdfisher@spamcop.net
"Morituri Nolumus Mori."

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